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Automatic radiation dose monitoring for CT of trauma patients with different protocols: feasibility and accuracy


Higashigaito, K; Becker, A S; Sprengel, K; Simmen, H P; Wanner, G; Alkadhi, H (2016). Automatic radiation dose monitoring for CT of trauma patients with different protocols: feasibility and accuracy. Clinical Radiology, 71(9):905-911.

Abstract

AIM: To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of automatic radiation dose monitoring software for computed tomography (CT) of trauma patients in a clinical setting over time, and to evaluate the potential of radiation dose reduction using iterative reconstruction (IR).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a time period of 18 months, data from 378 consecutive thoraco-abdominal CT examinations of trauma patients were extracted using automatic radiation dose monitoring software, and patients were split into three cohorts: cohort 1, 64-section CT with filtered back projection, 200 mAs tube current-time product; cohort 2, 128-section CT with IR and identical imaging protocol; cohort 3, 128-section CT with IR, 150 mAs tube current-time product. Radiation dose parameters from the software were compared with the individual patient protocols. Image noise was measured and image quality was semi-quantitatively determined.
RESULTS: Automatic extraction of radiation dose metrics was feasible and accurate in all (100%) patients. All CT examinations were of diagnostic quality. There were no differences between cohorts 1 and 2 regarding volume CT dose index (CTDIvol; p=0.62), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (ED, both p=0.95), while noise was significantly lower (chest and abdomen, both -38%, p<0.017). Compared to cohort 1, CTDIvol, DLP, and ED in cohort 3 were significantly lower (all -25%, p<0.017), similar to the noise in the chest (-32%) and abdomen (-27%, both p<0.017). Compared to cohort 2, CTDIvol (-28%), DLP, and ED (both -26%) in cohort 3 was significantly lower (all, p<0.017), while noise in the chest (+9%) and abdomen (+18%) was significantly higher (all, p<0.017).
CONCLUSION: Automatic radiation dose monitoring software is feasible and accurate, and can be implemented in a clinical setting for evaluating the effects of lowering radiation doses of CT protocols over time.

Abstract

AIM: To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of automatic radiation dose monitoring software for computed tomography (CT) of trauma patients in a clinical setting over time, and to evaluate the potential of radiation dose reduction using iterative reconstruction (IR).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a time period of 18 months, data from 378 consecutive thoraco-abdominal CT examinations of trauma patients were extracted using automatic radiation dose monitoring software, and patients were split into three cohorts: cohort 1, 64-section CT with filtered back projection, 200 mAs tube current-time product; cohort 2, 128-section CT with IR and identical imaging protocol; cohort 3, 128-section CT with IR, 150 mAs tube current-time product. Radiation dose parameters from the software were compared with the individual patient protocols. Image noise was measured and image quality was semi-quantitatively determined.
RESULTS: Automatic extraction of radiation dose metrics was feasible and accurate in all (100%) patients. All CT examinations were of diagnostic quality. There were no differences between cohorts 1 and 2 regarding volume CT dose index (CTDIvol; p=0.62), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (ED, both p=0.95), while noise was significantly lower (chest and abdomen, both -38%, p<0.017). Compared to cohort 1, CTDIvol, DLP, and ED in cohort 3 were significantly lower (all -25%, p<0.017), similar to the noise in the chest (-32%) and abdomen (-27%, both p<0.017). Compared to cohort 2, CTDIvol (-28%), DLP, and ED (both -26%) in cohort 3 was significantly lower (all, p<0.017), while noise in the chest (+9%) and abdomen (+18%) was significantly higher (all, p<0.017).
CONCLUSION: Automatic radiation dose monitoring software is feasible and accurate, and can be implemented in a clinical setting for evaluating the effects of lowering radiation doses of CT protocols over time.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:24 May 2016
Deposited On:31 May 2016 15:26
Last Modified:28 Jul 2016 01:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0009-9260
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2016.04.023
PubMed ID:27234434

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