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Long-term follow-up after aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® biological valved conduit: a word of caution!


Sahin, Ayhan; Müggler, Oliver; Sromicki, Juri; Caliskan, Etem; Reser, Diana; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Alkadhi, Hatem; Maisano, Francesco; Falk, Volkmar; Holubec, Tomas (2016). Long-term follow-up after aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® biological valved conduit: a word of caution! European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 50(6):1172-1178.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyse long-term results of aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® NR-2000C conduit.
METHODS: From January 2001 to October 2005, 63 patients with a median age of 62 years underwent aortic root replacement with a Shelhigh® conduit. Aneurysm (27%), aortic valve endocarditis (30%) and acute type A aortic dissection (33%) were the predominant indications for the surgery. Fifty-four patients (86%) were entered in the follow-up study with the end-points of death, aortic root-related reoperation and endocarditis.
RESULTS: The overall 30-day mortality rate was 8% (n = 5). The median follow-up was 9.5 years (range 0-14.2 years). In total, 13 (24%) deaths occurred during follow-up; of these, 4 were directly conduit-related. The overall estimated survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were 85 ± 5, 79 ± 6 and 71 ± 7%, respectively. Reoperation was necessary in 10 (19%) patients due to endocarditis (n = 5), aortic stenosis (n = 3), pseudoaneurysm due to detachment of the right coronary artery (n = 1) and detachment of the non-coronary leaflet (n = 1). The overall estimated rate of freedom from aortic root-related reoperation at 1, 5 and 10 years was 83 ± 5, 79 ± 6 and 64 ± 7%, respectively. Endocarditis of the prosthesis was reported in 9 (17%) patients; of whom, 5 patients required reoperation and 4 were treated medically. In 1 patient with endocarditis, a stroke was reported due to a thromboembolic event.
CONCLUSIONS: The first long-term follow-up after aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® BioConduit revealed a relatively high rate of death and very high rate of reoperations due to endocarditis, aorto-ventricular disconnection and structural valve failure. This may be potentially connected to the nature of the implanted valved conduit.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyse long-term results of aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® NR-2000C conduit.
METHODS: From January 2001 to October 2005, 63 patients with a median age of 62 years underwent aortic root replacement with a Shelhigh® conduit. Aneurysm (27%), aortic valve endocarditis (30%) and acute type A aortic dissection (33%) were the predominant indications for the surgery. Fifty-four patients (86%) were entered in the follow-up study with the end-points of death, aortic root-related reoperation and endocarditis.
RESULTS: The overall 30-day mortality rate was 8% (n = 5). The median follow-up was 9.5 years (range 0-14.2 years). In total, 13 (24%) deaths occurred during follow-up; of these, 4 were directly conduit-related. The overall estimated survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were 85 ± 5, 79 ± 6 and 71 ± 7%, respectively. Reoperation was necessary in 10 (19%) patients due to endocarditis (n = 5), aortic stenosis (n = 3), pseudoaneurysm due to detachment of the right coronary artery (n = 1) and detachment of the non-coronary leaflet (n = 1). The overall estimated rate of freedom from aortic root-related reoperation at 1, 5 and 10 years was 83 ± 5, 79 ± 6 and 64 ± 7%, respectively. Endocarditis of the prosthesis was reported in 9 (17%) patients; of whom, 5 patients required reoperation and 4 were treated medically. In 1 patient with endocarditis, a stroke was reported due to a thromboembolic event.
CONCLUSIONS: The first long-term follow-up after aortic root replacement with the Shelhigh® BioConduit revealed a relatively high rate of death and very high rate of reoperations due to endocarditis, aorto-ventricular disconnection and structural valve failure. This may be potentially connected to the nature of the implanted valved conduit.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:26 May 2016
Deposited On:31 May 2016 15:30
Last Modified:21 Dec 2016 02:00
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1010-7940
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ejcts/ezw167
PubMed ID:27229673

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