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Disease-specific sparing of the anterior semicircular canals in bilateral vestibulopathy


Tarnutzer, A A; Bockisch, C J; Buffone, E; Weiler, S; Bachmann, L M; Weber, K P (2016). Disease-specific sparing of the anterior semicircular canals in bilateral vestibulopathy. Clinical Neurophysiology, 127(8):2791-2801.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) is often diagnosed with great delay and an underlying cause is only identified in 50-80%. We measured horizontal and vertical semicircular canal function using the video-head-impulse test (vHIT) and hypothesized that specific vHIT-patterns may be linked to certain etiologies.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 109 BVL-patients linked to aminoglycoside vestibulotoxicity (n=16), Menière's disease (n=10), infectious inner-ear disorders (n=11), sensorineural hearing-loss (n=11), cerebellar-ataxia-neuropathy-vestibular-areflexia-syndrome (CANVAS, n=5), other causes (n=19) as well as those with unknown origin (n=47). Vestibulo-ocular reflex gains and cumulative saccade amplitudes were measured with vHIT, and the functional integrity of all semicircular canals was rated.
RESULTS: Overall, anterior canal hypofunction (n=86/218) was identified significantly (p<0.001) less often than horizontal (n=186/218) and posterior (n=194/218) hypofunction. Preserved anterior canal function was associated with aminoglycoside vestibulotoxicity, Menière's disease and BVL of unknown origin, while no such sparing was found for inner-ear infections, CANVAS and sensorineural hearing loss.
CONCLUSIONS: Semicircular canal function in BVL shows disease-specific dissociations, potentially related to reduced vulnerability or superior recovery of the anterior canals.
SIGNIFICANCE: In patients with suspected BVL we recommend quantifying vHIT gains and saccade amplitudes for all semicircular canals as the pattern of canal hypofunction may help identifying the underlying disorder.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) is often diagnosed with great delay and an underlying cause is only identified in 50-80%. We measured horizontal and vertical semicircular canal function using the video-head-impulse test (vHIT) and hypothesized that specific vHIT-patterns may be linked to certain etiologies.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 109 BVL-patients linked to aminoglycoside vestibulotoxicity (n=16), Menière's disease (n=10), infectious inner-ear disorders (n=11), sensorineural hearing-loss (n=11), cerebellar-ataxia-neuropathy-vestibular-areflexia-syndrome (CANVAS, n=5), other causes (n=19) as well as those with unknown origin (n=47). Vestibulo-ocular reflex gains and cumulative saccade amplitudes were measured with vHIT, and the functional integrity of all semicircular canals was rated.
RESULTS: Overall, anterior canal hypofunction (n=86/218) was identified significantly (p<0.001) less often than horizontal (n=186/218) and posterior (n=194/218) hypofunction. Preserved anterior canal function was associated with aminoglycoside vestibulotoxicity, Menière's disease and BVL of unknown origin, while no such sparing was found for inner-ear infections, CANVAS and sensorineural hearing loss.
CONCLUSIONS: Semicircular canal function in BVL shows disease-specific dissociations, potentially related to reduced vulnerability or superior recovery of the anterior canals.
SIGNIFICANCE: In patients with suspected BVL we recommend quantifying vHIT gains and saccade amplitudes for all semicircular canals as the pattern of canal hypofunction may help identifying the underlying disorder.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:10 Jun 2016 09:13
Last Modified:01 Jun 2017 00:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2016.05.005
PubMed ID:27417055

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

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