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Evolving natural history of coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus


Krolewski, Andrzej S; Warram, James H; Valsania, Paola; Martin, Blaise C; Laffel, Lori M B; Christlieb, A Richard (1991). Evolving natural history of coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus. American Journal of Medicine, 90(2A):56S-61S.

Abstract

White diabetic patients are at high risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). The natural history of CAD in insulin-dependent (ID) and noninsulin-dependent (NID) diabetes mellitus (DM) is reviewed to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for the development of premature or accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. In both IDDM and NIDDM, the risk of CAD increases with lengthening duration of diabetes; the risk, however, does not grow as a constant multiple of the nondiabetic risk of CAD, suggesting that the cumulative exposure to diabetes plays a significant role as a risk factor for CAD only in a subset of patients. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the diabetic milieu has an impact on the progression of atherosclerotic lesions but not on their initiation. This hypothesis is corroborated further by the observation that CAD does not occur in diabetic patients in populations with a low risk of CAD among nondiabetic patients. The component of the diabetic milieu responsible for promotion of atherosclerotic lesions is unknown. There is evidence, however, of a direct or indirect role of hyperinsulinemia in this process.

Abstract

White diabetic patients are at high risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). The natural history of CAD in insulin-dependent (ID) and noninsulin-dependent (NID) diabetes mellitus (DM) is reviewed to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for the development of premature or accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. In both IDDM and NIDDM, the risk of CAD increases with lengthening duration of diabetes; the risk, however, does not grow as a constant multiple of the nondiabetic risk of CAD, suggesting that the cumulative exposure to diabetes plays a significant role as a risk factor for CAD only in a subset of patients. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the diabetic milieu has an impact on the progression of atherosclerotic lesions but not on their initiation. This hypothesis is corroborated further by the observation that CAD does not occur in diabetic patients in populations with a low risk of CAD among nondiabetic patients. The component of the diabetic milieu responsible for promotion of atherosclerotic lesions is unknown. There is evidence, however, of a direct or indirect role of hyperinsulinemia in this process.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 February 1991
Deposited On:20 Jun 2016 09:51
Last Modified:26 Jun 2016 06:22
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0002-9343
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(91)90040-5
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:default_scope:ebi01_prod000986037 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:1994719

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