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Substrate-assisted catalysis by PARP10 limits its activity to mono-ADP-ribosylation


Kleine, H; Poreba, E; Lesniewicz, K; Hassa, P O; Hottiger, M O; Litchfield, D W; Shilton, B H; Lüscher, B (2008). Substrate-assisted catalysis by PARP10 limits its activity to mono-ADP-ribosylation. Molecular Cell, 32(1):57-69.

Abstract

ADP-ribosylation controls many processes, including transcription, DNA repair, and bacterial toxicity. ADP-ribosyltransferases and poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) catalyze mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation, respectively, and depend on a highly conserved glutamate residue in the active center for catalysis. However, there is an apparent absence of this glutamate for the recently described PARP6-PARP16, raising questions about how these enzymes function. We find that PARP10, in contrast to PARP1, lacks the catalytic glutamate and has transferase rather than polymerase activity. Despite this fundamental difference, PARP10 also modifies acidic residues. Consequently, we propose an alternative catalytic mechanism for PARP10 compared to PARP1 in which the acidic target residue of the substrate functionally substitutes for the catalytic glutamate by using substrate-assisted catalysis to transfer ADP-ribose. This mechanism explains why the novel PARPs are unable to function as polymerases. This discovery will help to illuminate the different biological functions of mono- versus poly-ADP-ribosylation in cells.

Abstract

ADP-ribosylation controls many processes, including transcription, DNA repair, and bacterial toxicity. ADP-ribosyltransferases and poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) catalyze mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation, respectively, and depend on a highly conserved glutamate residue in the active center for catalysis. However, there is an apparent absence of this glutamate for the recently described PARP6-PARP16, raising questions about how these enzymes function. We find that PARP10, in contrast to PARP1, lacks the catalytic glutamate and has transferase rather than polymerase activity. Despite this fundamental difference, PARP10 also modifies acidic residues. Consequently, we propose an alternative catalytic mechanism for PARP10 compared to PARP1 in which the acidic target residue of the substrate functionally substitutes for the catalytic glutamate by using substrate-assisted catalysis to transfer ADP-ribose. This mechanism explains why the novel PARPs are unable to function as polymerases. This discovery will help to illuminate the different biological functions of mono- versus poly-ADP-ribosylation in cells.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Date:2008
Deposited On:04 Feb 2009 10:42
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 10:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1097-2765
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2008.08.009

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