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Ungenügender Früchte- und Gemüsekonsum in der Schweiz: Resultate der Schweizerischen Gesundheitsbefragung 1992/93


Eichholzer, Monika; Bisig, Brigitte (1999). Ungenügender Früchte- und Gemüsekonsum in der Schweiz: Resultate der Schweizerischen Gesundheitsbefragung 1992/93. Sozial- und Präventivmedizin, 44(4):143-151.

Abstract

Inadequate consumption of fruit and vegetables increases the risk of various (chronical) diseases. It is therefore recommended to eat at least three portions of vegetables and two portions of fruit every day. The present study aims to determine the prevalence of inadequate fruit and vegetable (potatoes are not regarded as vegetables in Switzerland) consumption in Switzerland and to determine sociodemographic and lifestyle correlates of inadequate consumption. Data presented in this study were taken from the first national representative health survey for Switzerland (conducted 1992/1993) including 7930 men and 7358 women (response rate 71%), age 15 and over. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions controlling for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were done. Inadequate consumption of fruit and vegetables was common among the study population. Less than daily consumption of fruit was reported by about 30%, of vegetables by 17%. About 25% of study participants do not eat fruit or vegetables every day, for 11% the consumption of both is insufficient. Men, young people, study participants with a low educational background, people living in the French and Italian speaking part of Switzerland, smokers and participants with low physical activity reported more often inadequate fruit and vegetable intake than women, older people, well educated study participants, inhabitants of the German speaking part of Switzerland, nonsmokers, and less physically active people. These results stress the need for nutrition education programs aimed at increased consumption of fruit and vegetables in Switzerland.

Abstract

Inadequate consumption of fruit and vegetables increases the risk of various (chronical) diseases. It is therefore recommended to eat at least three portions of vegetables and two portions of fruit every day. The present study aims to determine the prevalence of inadequate fruit and vegetable (potatoes are not regarded as vegetables in Switzerland) consumption in Switzerland and to determine sociodemographic and lifestyle correlates of inadequate consumption. Data presented in this study were taken from the first national representative health survey for Switzerland (conducted 1992/1993) including 7930 men and 7358 women (response rate 71%), age 15 and over. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions controlling for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were done. Inadequate consumption of fruit and vegetables was common among the study population. Less than daily consumption of fruit was reported by about 30%, of vegetables by 17%. About 25% of study participants do not eat fruit or vegetables every day, for 11% the consumption of both is insufficient. Men, young people, study participants with a low educational background, people living in the French and Italian speaking part of Switzerland, smokers and participants with low physical activity reported more often inadequate fruit and vegetable intake than women, older people, well educated study participants, inhabitants of the German speaking part of Switzerland, nonsmokers, and less physically active people. These results stress the need for nutrition education programs aimed at increased consumption of fruit and vegetables in Switzerland.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption in Switzerland: results of the Swiss Health Survey 1992/93
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1999
Deposited On:22 Jun 2016 12:21
Last Modified:26 Jun 2016 05:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0303-8408
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01300270
Related URLs:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/124616/
PubMed ID:10510832

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