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Indigenous cultural heritage and fair trade: voluntary certification standards in the light of WIPO and WTO law and policymaking


Graber, Christoph Beat; Lai, Jessica Christine (2011). Indigenous cultural heritage and fair trade: voluntary certification standards in the light of WIPO and WTO law and policymaking. i-call Working Paper Series 01, Universität Luzern.

Abstract

Private initiatives of voluntary certification standards appear to be an attractive alternative to top-down approaches in the field of ICH and development. Over the last 50 years, many different Indigenous communities have attempted to use certification trade marks to promote their authentic cultural products, while at the same time marginalising those that are not. These different schemes have had varying success, but arguably none have been as visually unsuccessful as the government-funded Australian system, which collapsed within two years of its inception. On the other side of the scale, the Fairtrade Label is considered to be an international triumphant success. This paper assesses why the Australian Authenticity Label system failed, as compared to the success of the Fairtrade Label, and how these conclusions can be used for existing and future endeavours. It further discusses whether such a voluntary certification system would be compliant with WIPO and WTO law and policy. It concludes by looking towards the future and the possibility of the Fairtrade Label being extended to meet the interests of Indigenous communities.

Abstract

Private initiatives of voluntary certification standards appear to be an attractive alternative to top-down approaches in the field of ICH and development. Over the last 50 years, many different Indigenous communities have attempted to use certification trade marks to promote their authentic cultural products, while at the same time marginalising those that are not. These different schemes have had varying success, but arguably none have been as visually unsuccessful as the government-funded Australian system, which collapsed within two years of its inception. On the other side of the scale, the Fairtrade Label is considered to be an international triumphant success. This paper assesses why the Australian Authenticity Label system failed, as compared to the success of the Fairtrade Label, and how these conclusions can be used for existing and future endeavours. It further discusses whether such a voluntary certification system would be compliant with WIPO and WTO law and policy. It concludes by looking towards the future and the possibility of the Fairtrade Label being extended to meet the interests of Indigenous communities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:Working Paper Series > i-call Working Paper Series
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Jun 2016 08:52
Last Modified:07 Apr 2017 04:24
Series Name:i-call Working Paper Series
Number of Pages:24
ISSN:1664-0144
Related URLs:http://www.rwi.uzh.ch/lehreforschung/alphabetisch/graber/Research/workingpapers.html (Organisation)

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