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Physische Aktivität und Blutdruck . eine epidemiologische Kurzreview des primärpräventiven Effekts von körperlich-sportlicher Betätigung


Marti, Bernard (1992). Physische Aktivität und Blutdruck . eine epidemiologische Kurzreview des primärpräventiven Effekts von körperlich-sportlicher Betätigung. Schweizerische Rundschau für Medizin PRAXIS, 81(15):473-479.

Abstract

The relation between physical exercise and blood pressure as well as the risk of hypertension has been investigated extensively during recent years. Cross-sectional studies on exercising and physically fit subjects have shown that endurance capacity (i. e. maximum aerobic capacity) is inversely related to resting blood pressure. However, not all physical activities are associated with lower blood pressure levels; e.g. swimming, weight lifting and competitive cross-country skiing were found to be related to elevated blood pressure values in some studies. Population-based investigations reveal a trend towards lower blood pressure values in physically habitually active persons, with the difference between active and inactive subjects not exceeding 5 mmHg. Three epidemiological cohort studies have consistently demonstrated that sedentary, unfit persons have a 20 to 50% higher prospective risk of hypertension, as compared to exercising, physically fit persons. Some intervention studies with normotensive subjects show a reduction in resting blood pressure of 5 to 10 mmHg at best after several months of aerobic training, while other studies show no effect. At least two factors could be responsible for these somewhat inconsistent observations: 1. exercise intensity may act as an 'effect modifier', since vigorous to maximally hard exercise rather increases than lowers resting blood pressure, 2. in statistical analysis on the effect of physical training on blood pressure, it is crucial whether concomitant changes in body weight and body composition are taken into account: any adjustment for changes in body composition will substantially reduce the magnitude of 'exercise-induced' reductions in blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Abstract

The relation between physical exercise and blood pressure as well as the risk of hypertension has been investigated extensively during recent years. Cross-sectional studies on exercising and physically fit subjects have shown that endurance capacity (i. e. maximum aerobic capacity) is inversely related to resting blood pressure. However, not all physical activities are associated with lower blood pressure levels; e.g. swimming, weight lifting and competitive cross-country skiing were found to be related to elevated blood pressure values in some studies. Population-based investigations reveal a trend towards lower blood pressure values in physically habitually active persons, with the difference between active and inactive subjects not exceeding 5 mmHg. Three epidemiological cohort studies have consistently demonstrated that sedentary, unfit persons have a 20 to 50% higher prospective risk of hypertension, as compared to exercising, physically fit persons. Some intervention studies with normotensive subjects show a reduction in resting blood pressure of 5 to 10 mmHg at best after several months of aerobic training, while other studies show no effect. At least two factors could be responsible for these somewhat inconsistent observations: 1. exercise intensity may act as an 'effect modifier', since vigorous to maximally hard exercise rather increases than lowers resting blood pressure, 2. in statistical analysis on the effect of physical training on blood pressure, it is crucial whether concomitant changes in body weight and body composition are taken into account: any adjustment for changes in body composition will substantially reduce the magnitude of 'exercise-induced' reductions in blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Physical activity and blood pressure. An epidemiological brief review of primary preventive effects of physical exercise activities
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:7 April 1992
Deposited On:29 Jun 2016 14:21
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 19:46
Publisher:Hallwag
ISSN:1013-2058
PubMed ID:1565938

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