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Familial clustering of insulin sensitivity


Martin, Blaise C; Warram, James H; Rosner, Bernard; Rich, Stephen S; Soeldner, J Stuart; Krolewski, Andrzej S (1992). Familial clustering of insulin sensitivity. Diabetes, 41(7):850-854.

Abstract

This study's objective was to determine whether there is familial clustering of insulin sensitivity (SI) or insulin-independent glucose uptake (SG), which would be evidence that they are genetically determined traits. Outpatients had a 3-h intravenous glucose tolerance test. Nondiabetic individuals (n = 183), ranging in age from 16 to 60 yr, were from 105 families that had 2 parents with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Of these families, 62 contributed 1 offspring, 21 contributed 2, 13 contributed 3, 6 contributed 4, and 2 and 1 contributed 5 and 6, respectively. The minimal model of glucose disposal and the glucose and insulin values from the intravenous glucose tolerance tests were used to estimate SI and SG. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to compare the within-family variability of SI and SG with the respective between-family distributions. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.26 (P = 0.008) for SI and 0.081 (P = 0.45) for SG. SI and SG were uncorrelated (r = -0.059, P = 0.42). The intraclass correlation of SI could not be explained by familial clustering of fasting insulin or ideal body weight. Finally, the 10 families with the lowest values of SI had a significantly higher within-sibship variability of SI than the other 33 families (P less than 0.001, F test). SI but not SG showed familial clustering, which is consistent with a polygenic determinant of SI. In addition, a large within-family variability of SI in some families is compatible with a major gene effect with a dominant mode of inheritance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Abstract

This study's objective was to determine whether there is familial clustering of insulin sensitivity (SI) or insulin-independent glucose uptake (SG), which would be evidence that they are genetically determined traits. Outpatients had a 3-h intravenous glucose tolerance test. Nondiabetic individuals (n = 183), ranging in age from 16 to 60 yr, were from 105 families that had 2 parents with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Of these families, 62 contributed 1 offspring, 21 contributed 2, 13 contributed 3, 6 contributed 4, and 2 and 1 contributed 5 and 6, respectively. The minimal model of glucose disposal and the glucose and insulin values from the intravenous glucose tolerance tests were used to estimate SI and SG. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to compare the within-family variability of SI and SG with the respective between-family distributions. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.26 (P = 0.008) for SI and 0.081 (P = 0.45) for SG. SI and SG were uncorrelated (r = -0.059, P = 0.42). The intraclass correlation of SI could not be explained by familial clustering of fasting insulin or ideal body weight. Finally, the 10 families with the lowest values of SI had a significantly higher within-sibship variability of SI than the other 33 families (P less than 0.001, F test). SI but not SG showed familial clustering, which is consistent with a polygenic determinant of SI. In addition, a large within-family variability of SI in some families is compatible with a major gene effect with a dominant mode of inheritance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 1992
Deposited On:29 Jun 2016 14:19
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 19:47
Publisher:American Diabetes Association
ISSN:0012-1797
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2337/diabetes.41.7.850
PubMed ID:1612199

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