Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Topical Timolol for Infantile Hemangiomas: Evidence for Efficacy and Degree of Systemic Absorption


Weibel, Lisa; Barysch, Marjam J; Scheer, Helene S; Königs, Ingo; Neuhaus, Kathrin; Schiestl, Clemens; Rentsch, Katharina; Müller, Daniel M; Theiler, Martin (2016). Topical Timolol for Infantile Hemangiomas: Evidence for Efficacy and Degree of Systemic Absorption. Pediatric Dermatology, 33(2):184-190.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Topical use of timolol for infantile hemangiomas has recently emerged with promising results. It is unknown whether topical β-blockers act locally or if their effect is partly due to systemic absorption. This study investigates whether topically applied timolol is absorbed and reports on the efficacy of this treatment. METHODS We treated 40 infants with small proliferating hemangiomas with topical timolol gel 0.5% twice daily and assessed urinary excretion and serum levels in a proportion of patients. Clinical response was evaluated on a visual analog scale of standardized photographs after 1, 2, 3, and 5 months. RESULTS Forty infants with a median age of 18 weeks (range 2-35 wks) were included; 23 (58%) had superficial and 17 (42%) mixed-type hemangiomas. The median size was 3 cm(2) (range 0.1-15 cm(2) ) and nine hemangiomas were ulcerated. The hemangiomas improved significantly during treatment, with a median increase in visual analog scale of 7 points after 5 months (p < 0.001). Urinalysis for timolol was performed in 24 patients and was positive in 20 patients (83%). In three infants, serum levels of timolol were also measured and were all positive (median 0.16 ng/mL [range 0.1-0.18 ng/mL]). No significant side effects were recorded. CONCLUSION Topical therapy with timolol is effective for infantile hemangiomas, but systemic absorption occurs. Serum levels in our patients were low, suggesting that using timolol for small hemangiomas is safe, but caution is advised when treating ulcerated or large hemangiomas, very young infants, or concomitantly using systemic propranolol.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Topical use of timolol for infantile hemangiomas has recently emerged with promising results. It is unknown whether topical β-blockers act locally or if their effect is partly due to systemic absorption. This study investigates whether topically applied timolol is absorbed and reports on the efficacy of this treatment. METHODS We treated 40 infants with small proliferating hemangiomas with topical timolol gel 0.5% twice daily and assessed urinary excretion and serum levels in a proportion of patients. Clinical response was evaluated on a visual analog scale of standardized photographs after 1, 2, 3, and 5 months. RESULTS Forty infants with a median age of 18 weeks (range 2-35 wks) were included; 23 (58%) had superficial and 17 (42%) mixed-type hemangiomas. The median size was 3 cm(2) (range 0.1-15 cm(2) ) and nine hemangiomas were ulcerated. The hemangiomas improved significantly during treatment, with a median increase in visual analog scale of 7 points after 5 months (p < 0.001). Urinalysis for timolol was performed in 24 patients and was positive in 20 patients (83%). In three infants, serum levels of timolol were also measured and were all positive (median 0.16 ng/mL [range 0.1-0.18 ng/mL]). No significant side effects were recorded. CONCLUSION Topical therapy with timolol is effective for infantile hemangiomas, but systemic absorption occurs. Serum levels in our patients were low, suggesting that using timolol for small hemangiomas is safe, but caution is advised when treating ulcerated or large hemangiomas, very young infants, or concomitantly using systemic propranolol.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:March 2016
Deposited On:28 Jun 2016 14:26
Last Modified:30 Jan 2017 08:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0736-8046
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.12767
PubMed ID:26840644

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations