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Quantifying the effect of electric current on cell adhesion studied by single-cell force spectroscopy


Jaatinen, Leena; Young, Eleanore; Hyttinen, Jari; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Demkó, László (2016). Quantifying the effect of electric current on cell adhesion studied by single-cell force spectroscopy. Biointerphases, 11(1):011004.

Abstract

This study presents the effect of external electric current on the cell adhesive and mechanical properties of the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line. Changes in cell morphology, viability, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion structure were studied by standard staining protocols, while single-cell force spectroscopy based on the fluidic force microscopy technology provided a rapid, serial quantification and detailed analysis of cell adhesion and its dynamics. The setup allowed measurements of adhesion forces up to the μN range, and total detachment distances over 40 μm. Force–distance curves have been fitted with a simple elastic model including a cell detachment protocol in order to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells, as well as to reveal changes in the dynamic properties as functions of the applied current dose. While the cell spreading area decreased monotonously with increasing current doses, small current doses resulted only in differences related to cellelasticity.Current doses above 11 As/m2, however, initiated more drastic changes in cell morphology, viability, cellular structure, as well as in properties related to cell adhesion. The observed differences, eventually leading to cell death toward higher doses, might originate from both the decrease in pH and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

Abstract

This study presents the effect of external electric current on the cell adhesive and mechanical properties of the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line. Changes in cell morphology, viability, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion structure were studied by standard staining protocols, while single-cell force spectroscopy based on the fluidic force microscopy technology provided a rapid, serial quantification and detailed analysis of cell adhesion and its dynamics. The setup allowed measurements of adhesion forces up to the μN range, and total detachment distances over 40 μm. Force–distance curves have been fitted with a simple elastic model including a cell detachment protocol in order to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells, as well as to reveal changes in the dynamic properties as functions of the applied current dose. While the cell spreading area decreased monotonously with increasing current doses, small current doses resulted only in differences related to cellelasticity.Current doses above 11 As/m2, however, initiated more drastic changes in cell morphology, viability, cellular structure, as well as in properties related to cell adhesion. The observed differences, eventually leading to cell death toward higher doses, might originate from both the decrease in pH and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:18 Jul 2016 07:35
Last Modified:18 Jul 2016 07:35
Publisher:AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces and Processing
ISSN:1559-4106
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1116/1.4940214
PubMed ID:26790407

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