Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Antibiotic prophylaxis in gastroduodenal surgery


Schilling, Julian; Michalopoulos, A; Geroulanos, S (1997). Antibiotic prophylaxis in gastroduodenal surgery. Hepato-gastroenterology, 44(13):116-120.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS
In a retrospective process quality control trial, proper use of antimicrobial prophylaxis in gastroduodenal operations according to the standard guidelines was studied.
PATIENTS AND METHODS
A total of 132 consecutive adult patients (pts), who underwent gastroduodenal surgery in a University Hospital, were enrolled to this study protocol. There were 88 males and 44 females of with mean (+/-SD) age of 58.7 (+/-9.1) years old. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on surgical antibiotic prophylaxis policy. Group A consisted of surgical pts receiving appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis (a 2nd generation cephalosporin) when there was indication. Group B consisted of pts without indication who did not receive prophylaxis, Group C pts who, although antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated, were not given prophylaxis, and Group D pts without indication who received prophylaxis.
RESULTS
Of 132 pts examined, appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis was received by 28 pts (21%) (Group A). In 62 pts (47%), antibiotic prophylaxis was not indicated and not administered (Group B). On the contrary, in 42 pts (32%), although antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated, it was not given (Group C). No patient received prophylaxis without indication. The following infections were found: wound infection (n = 10), pneumonia (n = 6), severe sepsis (n = 2), urinary tract infection (n = 2), and fever of unknown origin (n = 2). Where correct antibiotic prophylaxis policy was followed (Groups A and B), 6 post-operative infections occurred (6.7%), with a mean (+/-SD) hospital length of stay 14.4 (+/-3.2) days. In contrast, in the group with incorrect antibiotic prophylaxis policy (group D), 16 infectious complications occurred (38%) (p = 0.001), with a mean (+/-SD) hospital length of stay 22.5 (+/-4.4) days (p = 0.001). Total hospitalization costs were much higher in this group compared with Groups A and B (p = 0.01). Mortality rate was 9.5% in Group D, while no deaths occurred in the other groups (p = 0.01).
CONCLUSION
Antimicrobial prophylaxis policy is an important issue, targeting lower morbidity or avoidable costs.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS
In a retrospective process quality control trial, proper use of antimicrobial prophylaxis in gastroduodenal operations according to the standard guidelines was studied.
PATIENTS AND METHODS
A total of 132 consecutive adult patients (pts), who underwent gastroduodenal surgery in a University Hospital, were enrolled to this study protocol. There were 88 males and 44 females of with mean (+/-SD) age of 58.7 (+/-9.1) years old. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on surgical antibiotic prophylaxis policy. Group A consisted of surgical pts receiving appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis (a 2nd generation cephalosporin) when there was indication. Group B consisted of pts without indication who did not receive prophylaxis, Group C pts who, although antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated, were not given prophylaxis, and Group D pts without indication who received prophylaxis.
RESULTS
Of 132 pts examined, appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis was received by 28 pts (21%) (Group A). In 62 pts (47%), antibiotic prophylaxis was not indicated and not administered (Group B). On the contrary, in 42 pts (32%), although antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated, it was not given (Group C). No patient received prophylaxis without indication. The following infections were found: wound infection (n = 10), pneumonia (n = 6), severe sepsis (n = 2), urinary tract infection (n = 2), and fever of unknown origin (n = 2). Where correct antibiotic prophylaxis policy was followed (Groups A and B), 6 post-operative infections occurred (6.7%), with a mean (+/-SD) hospital length of stay 14.4 (+/-3.2) days. In contrast, in the group with incorrect antibiotic prophylaxis policy (group D), 16 infectious complications occurred (38%) (p = 0.001), with a mean (+/-SD) hospital length of stay 22.5 (+/-4.4) days (p = 0.001). Total hospitalization costs were much higher in this group compared with Groups A and B (p = 0.01). Mortality rate was 9.5% in Group D, while no deaths occurred in the other groups (p = 0.01).
CONCLUSION
Antimicrobial prophylaxis policy is an important issue, targeting lower morbidity or avoidable costs.

Statistics

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1997
Deposited On:19 Jul 2016 13:32
Last Modified:19 Jul 2016 13:32
Publisher:Hepato-Gastroenterology
ISSN:0172-6390
PubMed ID:9058128

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations