Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Contribution of genetic background and clinical risk factors to low-trauma fractures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons: the swiss HIV cohort study


Junier, Thomas; Rotger, Margalida; Biver, Emmanuel; Ledergerber, Bruno; Barceló, Catalina; Bartha, Istvan; Kovari, Helen; Schmid, Patrick; Fux, Christoph; Bernasconi, Enos; Brun Del Re, Claudia; Weber, Rainer; Fellay, Jacques; Tarr, Philip E (2016). Contribution of genetic background and clinical risk factors to low-trauma fractures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons: the swiss HIV cohort study. Open Forum Infectious Diseases, 3(2):ofw101.

Abstract

Background. The impact of human genetic background on low-trauma fracture (LTF) risk has not been evaluated in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and clinical LTF risk factors. Methods. In the general population, 6 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associate with LTF through genome-wide association study. Using genome-wide SNP arrays and imputation, we genotyped these SNPs in HIV-positive, white Swiss HIV Cohort Study participants. We included 103 individuals with a first, physician-validated LTF and 206 controls matched on gender, whose duration of observation and whose antiretroviral therapy start dates were similar using incidence density sampling. Analyses of nongenetic LTF risk factors were based on 158 cases and 788 controls. Results. A genetic risk score built from the 6 LTF-associated SNPs did not associate with LTF risk, in both models including and not including parental hip fracture history. The contribution of clinical LTF risk factors was limited in our dataset. Conclusions. Genetic LTF markers with a modest effect size in the general population do not improve fracture prediction in persons with HIV, in whom clinical LTF risk factors are prevalent in both cases and controls.

Abstract

Background. The impact of human genetic background on low-trauma fracture (LTF) risk has not been evaluated in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and clinical LTF risk factors. Methods. In the general population, 6 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associate with LTF through genome-wide association study. Using genome-wide SNP arrays and imputation, we genotyped these SNPs in HIV-positive, white Swiss HIV Cohort Study participants. We included 103 individuals with a first, physician-validated LTF and 206 controls matched on gender, whose duration of observation and whose antiretroviral therapy start dates were similar using incidence density sampling. Analyses of nongenetic LTF risk factors were based on 158 cases and 788 controls. Results. A genetic risk score built from the 6 LTF-associated SNPs did not associate with LTF risk, in both models including and not including parental hip fracture history. The contribution of clinical LTF risk factors was limited in our dataset. Conclusions. Genetic LTF markers with a modest effect size in the general population do not improve fracture prediction in persons with HIV, in whom clinical LTF risk factors are prevalent in both cases and controls.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

9 downloads since deposited on 04 Aug 2016
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2016
Deposited On:04 Aug 2016 11:58
Last Modified:06 Aug 2017 22:46
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:2328-8957
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofw101
PubMed ID:27419173

Download

Download PDF  'Contribution of genetic background and clinical risk factors to low-trauma fractures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons: the swiss HIV cohort study'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 182kB
View at publisher