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The dysconnection hypothesis (2016)


Friston, Karl; Brown, Harriet R; Siemerkus, Jakob; Stephan, Klaas E (2016). The dysconnection hypothesis (2016). Schizophrenia Research, 176(2-3):83-94.

Abstract

Twenty years have passed since the dysconnection hypothesis was first proposed (Friston and Frith, 1995; Weinberger, 1993). In that time, neuroscience has witnessed tremendous advances: we now live in a world of non-invasive neuroanatomy, computational neuroimaging and the Bayesian brain. The genomics era has come and gone. Connectomics and large-scale neuroinformatics initiatives are emerging everywhere. So where is the dysconnection hypothesis now? This article considers how the notion of schizophrenia as a dysconnection syndrome has developed – and how it has been enriched by recent advances in clinical neuroscience. In particular, we examine the dysconnection hypothesis in the context of (i) theoretical neurobiology and computational psychiatry; (ii) the empirical insights afforded by neuroimaging and associated connectomics – and (iii) how bottom-up (molecular biology and genetics) and top-down (systems biology) perspectives are converging on the mechanisms and nature of dysconnections in schizophrenia.

Abstract

Twenty years have passed since the dysconnection hypothesis was first proposed (Friston and Frith, 1995; Weinberger, 1993). In that time, neuroscience has witnessed tremendous advances: we now live in a world of non-invasive neuroanatomy, computational neuroimaging and the Bayesian brain. The genomics era has come and gone. Connectomics and large-scale neuroinformatics initiatives are emerging everywhere. So where is the dysconnection hypothesis now? This article considers how the notion of schizophrenia as a dysconnection syndrome has developed – and how it has been enriched by recent advances in clinical neuroscience. In particular, we examine the dysconnection hypothesis in the context of (i) theoretical neurobiology and computational psychiatry; (ii) the empirical insights afforded by neuroimaging and associated connectomics – and (iii) how bottom-up (molecular biology and genetics) and top-down (systems biology) perspectives are converging on the mechanisms and nature of dysconnections in schizophrenia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Schizophrenia; Dysconnection; Neuromodulation; Bayesian; Predictive coding; Neurogenetics
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:10 Aug 2016 11:56
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 20:09
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0920-9964
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2016.07.014
Official URL:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920996416303310
PubMed ID:27450778

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