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Can galactography-guided stereotactic, 11-gauge, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of intraductal lesions serve as an alternative to surgical biopsy?


Reiner, Caecilia S; Helbich, Thomas H; Rudas, Margaretha; Ponhold, Lothar; Riedl, Christopher C; Kropf, Nina; Fuchsjäger, Michael H (2009). Can galactography-guided stereotactic, 11-gauge, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of intraductal lesions serve as an alternative to surgical biopsy? European Radiology, 19(12):2878-2885.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the value of galactography-guided, stereotactic, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) for the assessment of intraductal breast lesions and its potential as a therapeutic tool that could eliminate the need for surgical excision. Eighteen patients (median age 64 years, range 37-80) with nipple discharge and galactography-verified intraductal lesions underwent galactography-guided, stereotactic, 11-gauge VABB followed by surgery. Histopathology findings from VABB and subsequent surgery were compared. Underestimation and false-negative rates were assessed. After VABB, histopathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in three (17%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in six (33%), high-risk lesions in six (33%) and benign lesions in three (17%) cases. After surgical biopsy, histopathology confirmed the previously established diagnosis in 11 lesions (61%). The underestimation rate for high-risk lesions and DCIS was 50% (6/12). The false-negative rate was 7% (1/14). Histopathology examination after surgery showed that not a single lesion had been completely removed at VABB. Galactography-guided VABB is a feasible diagnostic tool. However, its value as a therapeutic procedure is limited because of the high number of underestimated and missed lesions and because of the histopathological detection of lesions' remnants in every case. Surgical excision should be the therapeutic gold standard in cases of pathological nipple discharge and galactography abnormalities.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the value of galactography-guided, stereotactic, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) for the assessment of intraductal breast lesions and its potential as a therapeutic tool that could eliminate the need for surgical excision. Eighteen patients (median age 64 years, range 37-80) with nipple discharge and galactography-verified intraductal lesions underwent galactography-guided, stereotactic, 11-gauge VABB followed by surgery. Histopathology findings from VABB and subsequent surgery were compared. Underestimation and false-negative rates were assessed. After VABB, histopathology revealed invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in three (17%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in six (33%), high-risk lesions in six (33%) and benign lesions in three (17%) cases. After surgical biopsy, histopathology confirmed the previously established diagnosis in 11 lesions (61%). The underestimation rate for high-risk lesions and DCIS was 50% (6/12). The false-negative rate was 7% (1/14). Histopathology examination after surgery showed that not a single lesion had been completely removed at VABB. Galactography-guided VABB is a feasible diagnostic tool. However, its value as a therapeutic procedure is limited because of the high number of underestimated and missed lesions and because of the histopathological detection of lesions' remnants in every case. Surgical excision should be the therapeutic gold standard in cases of pathological nipple discharge and galactography abnormalities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2009
Deposited On:17 Aug 2016 09:11
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 01:06
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-009-1502-7
PubMed ID:19565246

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