Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Regional differences in interhemispheric structural fibers in healthy, term infants


Makki, Malek I; Hagmann, Cornelia (2017). Regional differences in interhemispheric structural fibers in healthy, term infants. Journal of Neuroscience Research, 95(3):876-884.

Abstract

Using fiber tracking we investigated the early interhemispheric to cortical development by segmenting the corpus callosum (CC) in five substructures, genu, rostrum, body, isthmus, and splenium, and to examine gender differences in healthy, term neonates. Twenty neonates (11 boys aged 39 ± 2 days, nine girls aged 39 ± 1 days) were scanned in natural sleep with diffusion tensor imging and 35 gradient directions. Fiber tracking was performed using the FACT algorithm. The CC was segments in five substructures on midsagittal imaging. The fiber axial and radial diffusion were measured along with apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy. Volume measures were performed for each of these substructures using high-resolution isotropic 3D T1-weighted images. Radial and mean diffusivity in all measured interhemispheric connections were significantly higher in male newborn infants than in female. Second, a gender-dependent regional difference of the measured interhemispheric connections exists. There was no volume difference between boys and girls in any of the five studied sudsubstructures. In addition there was no association between macrostructural and microstructural differences either in boys or girls. The cytoarchitecture and the integrity of the interhemispheric fibers is more developed in female infants in all subdivisions of the CC, except for the isthmus. This might result from a larger axonal diameter, highly packed fibers, or more well-developed myelin sheath. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Abstract

Using fiber tracking we investigated the early interhemispheric to cortical development by segmenting the corpus callosum (CC) in five substructures, genu, rostrum, body, isthmus, and splenium, and to examine gender differences in healthy, term neonates. Twenty neonates (11 boys aged 39 ± 2 days, nine girls aged 39 ± 1 days) were scanned in natural sleep with diffusion tensor imging and 35 gradient directions. Fiber tracking was performed using the FACT algorithm. The CC was segments in five substructures on midsagittal imaging. The fiber axial and radial diffusion were measured along with apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy. Volume measures were performed for each of these substructures using high-resolution isotropic 3D T1-weighted images. Radial and mean diffusivity in all measured interhemispheric connections were significantly higher in male newborn infants than in female. Second, a gender-dependent regional difference of the measured interhemispheric connections exists. There was no volume difference between boys and girls in any of the five studied sudsubstructures. In addition there was no association between macrostructural and microstructural differences either in boys or girls. The cytoarchitecture and the integrity of the interhemispheric fibers is more developed in female infants in all subdivisions of the CC, except for the isthmus. This might result from a larger axonal diameter, highly packed fibers, or more well-developed myelin sheath. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
1 citation in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 08:53
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 07:21
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0360-4012
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jnr.23834
PubMed ID:27465433

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher