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Das Perfekt im Serbischen zwischen slavischer und balkanischer Entwicklung


Sonnenhauser, Barbara; Meermann, Anastasia (2016). Das Perfekt im Serbischen zwischen slavischer und balkanischer Entwicklung. In: Bazhutkina, Alena; Sonnenhauser, Barbara. Beiträge zur Slavistik. XXII. JungslavistInnen-Treffen in München, 12.-14. September 2013. Leipzig: Biblion Media, 83-110.

Abstract

The present paper is concerned with the formal and functional development of the analytic past, i.e. l-participle + auxiliary ‘to be’, in North Slavic (including Slovene) and Balkan Slavic. While in the former languages, the analytic past has developed into a narrative preterit, it is generally assumed to have kept its perfect semantics and additionally have acquired renarrative and evidential functions in Balkan Slavic. These functions are related to the omission of the auxiliary in the 3rd person. The variation in the usage of the auxiliary, in turn, is interpreted as underlying distinct morphological paradigms – perfect and renarrative – and hence as indicating a different path of development than observed for the rest of Slavic. Upon closer inspection, however, the development of these forms might have proceeded less differently in both language groups than traditionally assumed. This is suggested by the ‘auxiliary variation’ in colloquial Serbian and western Serbian dialects. Exhibiting functional similarities with both, Serbian is located at the junction between North and Balkan Slavic.

Abstract

The present paper is concerned with the formal and functional development of the analytic past, i.e. l-participle + auxiliary ‘to be’, in North Slavic (including Slovene) and Balkan Slavic. While in the former languages, the analytic past has developed into a narrative preterit, it is generally assumed to have kept its perfect semantics and additionally have acquired renarrative and evidential functions in Balkan Slavic. These functions are related to the omission of the auxiliary in the 3rd person. The variation in the usage of the auxiliary, in turn, is interpreted as underlying distinct morphological paradigms – perfect and renarrative – and hence as indicating a different path of development than observed for the rest of Slavic. Upon closer inspection, however, the development of these forms might have proceeded less differently in both language groups than traditionally assumed. This is suggested by the ‘auxiliary variation’ in colloquial Serbian and western Serbian dialects. Exhibiting functional similarities with both, Serbian is located at the junction between North and Balkan Slavic.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Slavonic Studies
08 University Research Priority Programs > Language and Space
Dewey Decimal Classification:490 Other languages
410 Linguistics
Language:German
Date:2016
Deposited On:26 Aug 2016 06:30
Last Modified:26 Aug 2016 06:50
Publisher:Biblion Media
ISBN:978-3-86688-588-2
Funders:FWF, DFG

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