Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mouse psychosocial stress reduces motivation and cognitive function in operant reward tests: A model for reward pathology with effects of agomelatine


Bergamini, Giorgio; Cathomas, Flurin; Auer, Sandra; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Patterson, Michael; Gabriel, Cecilia; Pryce, Christopher R (2016). Mouse psychosocial stress reduces motivation and cognitive function in operant reward tests: A model for reward pathology with effects of agomelatine. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 26(9):1448-1464.

Abstract

A major domain of depression is decreased motivation for reward. Translational automated tests can be applied in humans and animals to study operant reward behaviour, aetio-pathophysiology underlying deficits therein, and effects of antidepressant treatment. Three inter-related experiments were conducted to investigate depression-relevant effects of chronic psychosocial stress on operant behaviour in mice. (A) Non-manipulated mice were trained on a complex reversal learning (CRL) test with sucrose reinforcement; relative to vehicle (VEH), acute antidepressant agomelatine (AGO, 25mg/kg p.o.) increased reversals. (B) Mice underwent chronic social defeat (CSD) or control handling (CON) on days 1-15, and were administered AGO or VEH on days 10-22. In a progressive ratio schedule motivation test for sucrose on day 15, CSD mice made fewer responses; AGO tended to reverse this effect. In a CRL test on day 22, CSD mice completed fewer reversals; AGO tended to increase reversals in CSD mice associated with an adaptive increase in perseveration. (C) Mice with continuous operant access to water and saccharin solution in the home cage were exposed to CSD or CON; CSD mice made fewer responses for saccharin and water and drank less saccharin in the active period, and drank more water in the inactive period. In a separate CSD cohort, repeated AGO was without effect on these home cage operant and consummatory changes. Overall, this study demonstrates that psychosocial stress in mice leads to depression-relevant decreases in motivation and cognition in operant reward tests; partial reversal of these deficits by AGO provides evidence for predictive validity.

Abstract

A major domain of depression is decreased motivation for reward. Translational automated tests can be applied in humans and animals to study operant reward behaviour, aetio-pathophysiology underlying deficits therein, and effects of antidepressant treatment. Three inter-related experiments were conducted to investigate depression-relevant effects of chronic psychosocial stress on operant behaviour in mice. (A) Non-manipulated mice were trained on a complex reversal learning (CRL) test with sucrose reinforcement; relative to vehicle (VEH), acute antidepressant agomelatine (AGO, 25mg/kg p.o.) increased reversals. (B) Mice underwent chronic social defeat (CSD) or control handling (CON) on days 1-15, and were administered AGO or VEH on days 10-22. In a progressive ratio schedule motivation test for sucrose on day 15, CSD mice made fewer responses; AGO tended to reverse this effect. In a CRL test on day 22, CSD mice completed fewer reversals; AGO tended to increase reversals in CSD mice associated with an adaptive increase in perseveration. (C) Mice with continuous operant access to water and saccharin solution in the home cage were exposed to CSD or CON; CSD mice made fewer responses for saccharin and water and drank less saccharin in the active period, and drank more water in the inactive period. In a separate CSD cohort, repeated AGO was without effect on these home cage operant and consummatory changes. Overall, this study demonstrates that psychosocial stress in mice leads to depression-relevant decreases in motivation and cognition in operant reward tests; partial reversal of these deficits by AGO provides evidence for predictive validity.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 06 Sep 2016
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2016
Deposited On:06 Sep 2016 12:57
Last Modified:18 Nov 2016 13:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-977X
Funders:SNSF
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2016.06.009
PubMed ID:27422761

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 1 October 2017
Size: 332kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2017-10-01

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations