Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Precipitation modifies the effects of warming and nitrogen addition on soil microbial communities in northern Chinese grasslands


Zhang, Naili; Wan, Shiqiang; Guo, Jixun; Han, Guodong; Gutknecht, Jessica; Schmid, Bernhard; Yu, Liang; Liu, Weixing; Bi, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Keping (2015). Precipitation modifies the effects of warming and nitrogen addition on soil microbial communities in northern Chinese grasslands. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 89:12-23.

Abstract

Terrestrial ecosystems experience simultaneous shifts in multiple drivers of global change, which can interactively affect various resources. The concept that different resources co-limit plant productivity has been well studied. However, co-limitation of soil microbial communities by multiple resources has not been as thoroughly investigated. Specifically, it is not clearly understood how microbial communities respond to shifts in multiple interacting resources such as water, temperature, and nitrogen (N), in the context of global change. To test the effects of these various resources on soil microorganisms, we established a field experiment with temperature and N manipulation in three grasslands of northern China, where there is a decrease in precipitation from east to west across the region. We found that microbial responses to temperature depended upon seasonal water regimes in these temperate steppes. When there was sufficient water present, warming had positive effects on soil microorganisms, suggesting an interaction between water and increases in temperature enhanced local microbial communities. When drought or alternating wet–dry stress occurred, warming had detrimental effects on soil microbial communities. Our results also provide clear evidence for serial co-limitation of microorganisms by water and N at the functional group and community levels, where water is a primary limiting factor and N addition positively affects soil microorganisms only when water is sufficient. We predict that future microbial responses to changes in temperature and N availability could be seasonal or exist only in non-drought years, and will strongly rely on future precipitation regimes.

Abstract

Terrestrial ecosystems experience simultaneous shifts in multiple drivers of global change, which can interactively affect various resources. The concept that different resources co-limit plant productivity has been well studied. However, co-limitation of soil microbial communities by multiple resources has not been as thoroughly investigated. Specifically, it is not clearly understood how microbial communities respond to shifts in multiple interacting resources such as water, temperature, and nitrogen (N), in the context of global change. To test the effects of these various resources on soil microorganisms, we established a field experiment with temperature and N manipulation in three grasslands of northern China, where there is a decrease in precipitation from east to west across the region. We found that microbial responses to temperature depended upon seasonal water regimes in these temperate steppes. When there was sufficient water present, warming had positive effects on soil microorganisms, suggesting an interaction between water and increases in temperature enhanced local microbial communities. When drought or alternating wet–dry stress occurred, warming had detrimental effects on soil microbial communities. Our results also provide clear evidence for serial co-limitation of microorganisms by water and N at the functional group and community levels, where water is a primary limiting factor and N addition positively affects soil microorganisms only when water is sufficient. We predict that future microbial responses to changes in temperature and N availability could be seasonal or exist only in non-drought years, and will strongly rely on future precipitation regimes.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 13 Sep 2016
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:13 Sep 2016 14:08
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 08:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0038-0717
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2015.06.022

Download