Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Comparison of non-assisted versus head and tail rope-assisted recovery after emergency abdominal surgery in horses


Rüegg, Martina; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Hartnack, Sonja; Junge, Hannah K.; Theiss, Felix; Ringer, Simone K (2016). Comparison of non-assisted versus head and tail rope-assisted recovery after emergency abdominal surgery in horses. Pferdeheilkunde, 32(5):469-478.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare anaesthetic recoveries without assistance (group NA) to a head and tail rope-assisted technique (group A) after emergency abdominal surgery in horses. Additionally, possible risk factors for the quality of recovery (S: safe, NS: non-safe) were investigated and possible complications associated to the head and tail rope technique recorded. For that purpose 200 anaesthetic protocols (100NA, 100A) from horses that all received a standardised medetomidine-isoflurane balanced anaesthesia regime and medetomidine in combination with morphine for recovery were analysed retrospectively. No significant difference regarding recovery score was detected between NA and A horses. Fatalitalities (3/100 in each group) were similarly distributed between groups. However, in group NA only one horse died because of trauma during recovery. The other two horses died before attempting to stand up. All 3 horses that died in group A were euthanized because of trauma. Hypoxemia (defined as arterial oxygen partial pressure <60mmHg) during anaesthesia was a risk factor for non-safe recoveries. No influence was detected for age, weight, duration of general anaesthesia, reason of colic surgery, recovery technique (A, NA), hypotension during anaesthesia, time in lateral recumbency, time in sternal recumbency and time until standing. Several technical complications (material fail, twisting of ropes, halters slipping off and loss of ropes) were observed using the head and tail ropes, probably being partially responsible for the unexpectedly high number of dangerous and fatal recoveries observed in group A. The present study could not demonstrate that the head and tail rope technique can reduce fatalities or improve anaesthetic recovery scores after emergency abdominal surgery in horses. Hypoxemia during general anaesthesia increases the risk of non-safe recovery.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare anaesthetic recoveries without assistance (group NA) to a head and tail rope-assisted technique (group A) after emergency abdominal surgery in horses. Additionally, possible risk factors for the quality of recovery (S: safe, NS: non-safe) were investigated and possible complications associated to the head and tail rope technique recorded. For that purpose 200 anaesthetic protocols (100NA, 100A) from horses that all received a standardised medetomidine-isoflurane balanced anaesthesia regime and medetomidine in combination with morphine for recovery were analysed retrospectively. No significant difference regarding recovery score was detected between NA and A horses. Fatalitalities (3/100 in each group) were similarly distributed between groups. However, in group NA only one horse died because of trauma during recovery. The other two horses died before attempting to stand up. All 3 horses that died in group A were euthanized because of trauma. Hypoxemia (defined as arterial oxygen partial pressure <60mmHg) during anaesthesia was a risk factor for non-safe recoveries. No influence was detected for age, weight, duration of general anaesthesia, reason of colic surgery, recovery technique (A, NA), hypotension during anaesthesia, time in lateral recumbency, time in sternal recumbency and time until standing. Several technical complications (material fail, twisting of ropes, halters slipping off and loss of ropes) were observed using the head and tail ropes, probably being partially responsible for the unexpectedly high number of dangerous and fatal recoveries observed in group A. The present study could not demonstrate that the head and tail rope technique can reduce fatalities or improve anaesthetic recovery scores after emergency abdominal surgery in horses. Hypoxemia during general anaesthesia increases the risk of non-safe recovery.

Statistics

Downloads

67 downloads since deposited on 14 Sep 2016
67 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:14 Sep 2016 10:20
Last Modified:02 Jun 2017 18:48
Publisher:Hippiatrika Verlag GmbH
ISSN:0177-7726
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:UVET:ebi01_prod006404582 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 400kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations