Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

An exploratory study on user interaction challenges when handling interconnected requirements artifacts of various sizes


Ghazi, Parisa; Glinz, Martin (2016). An exploratory study on user interaction challenges when handling interconnected requirements artifacts of various sizes. In: Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, Beijing, China, 12 September 2016 - 16 September 2016.

Abstract

Requirements documentation is essential for developing software systems of non-trivial size. The cost of creating and maintaining documentation artifacts in terms of time and effort is significantly influenced by the tools with which engineers view, navigate and edit documentation artifacts. However, there is not much evidence about how well documentation tools actually support engineers, particularly when dealing with artifacts that are larger than the available display screen and with multiple artifacts at the same time. Therefore, we conducted an exploratory study based on 29 interviews with software practitioners to understand the current practice of presenting and manipulating artifacts in documentation tools, and how practitioners deal with the challenges encountered. Our study shows that a significant number of artifacts cannot be viewed entirely, even on large screens. Moreover, more than half of the participants use four or more artifacts concurrently. Nevertheless, current tools only provide primitive capabilities for handling concurrent and large artifacts, thus forcing engineers to create, for example, mental images of the currently used artifacts or use workarounds such as hanging printouts to the wall. Our results may trigger new research and help improve requirements engineering tools.

Abstract

Requirements documentation is essential for developing software systems of non-trivial size. The cost of creating and maintaining documentation artifacts in terms of time and effort is significantly influenced by the tools with which engineers view, navigate and edit documentation artifacts. However, there is not much evidence about how well documentation tools actually support engineers, particularly when dealing with artifacts that are larger than the available display screen and with multiple artifacts at the same time. Therefore, we conducted an exploratory study based on 29 interviews with software practitioners to understand the current practice of presenting and manipulating artifacts in documentation tools, and how practitioners deal with the challenges encountered. Our study shows that a significant number of artifacts cannot be viewed entirely, even on large screens. Moreover, more than half of the participants use four or more artifacts concurrently. Nevertheless, current tools only provide primitive capabilities for handling concurrent and large artifacts, thus forcing engineers to create, for example, mental images of the currently used artifacts or use workarounds such as hanging printouts to the wall. Our results may trigger new research and help improve requirements engineering tools.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

39 downloads since deposited on 22 Sep 2016
39 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:16 September 2016
Deposited On:22 Sep 2016 07:00
Last Modified:29 Jan 2017 07:20
Publisher:IEEE
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/RE.2016.52
Official URL:http://re16.org/pages/conference/conference_program/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:13680

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 757kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations