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Dialogische Textkompetenz – Routinisiertes Schreiben in studentischer Online-Teamarbeit


Lindemann, Katrin; Ruoss, Emanuel; Weinzinger, Caroline (2016). Dialogische Textkompetenz – Routinisiertes Schreiben in studentischer Online-Teamarbeit. ZFAL, 65(1):159-182.

Abstract

Current concepts in writing research primarily focus on monological texts, by which we mean texts that do not demand a reply. But nowadays, dialogical writing – the exchange of messages via e.g. e-mail, text message or internet forum – is increasingly prevalent in private, educational and professional life. We therefore argue that concepts of writing research should also be made applicable to dialogical writing. Based on empirical data from two university e-learning classes, we show how students use communicative routines in order to manage a specific (writing) task: During their group work students face the challenge of initiating new steps and mobilising other group members to proceed with the project. Our study shows that texts accomplishing this task usually follow a three-part structure: They give reasons why writing to the group becomes necessary (“account”), they request the start or continuation of working (“projection”) and they present a personal contribution to the task (“achievement/input”). In cooperative online work, appropriate dialogical writing is a crucial skill. This “dialogical text competence”, as we call it, cannot be taken for granted; indeed it must be taught and practiced as it differs from competences necessary in face-to-face interaction or for writing texts in non-dialogical contexts. We therefore close our paper with a discussion of our results under the aspect of learning and facilitating dialogical text competence in contexts that offer practical experience.

Abstract

Current concepts in writing research primarily focus on monological texts, by which we mean texts that do not demand a reply. But nowadays, dialogical writing – the exchange of messages via e.g. e-mail, text message or internet forum – is increasingly prevalent in private, educational and professional life. We therefore argue that concepts of writing research should also be made applicable to dialogical writing. Based on empirical data from two university e-learning classes, we show how students use communicative routines in order to manage a specific (writing) task: During their group work students face the challenge of initiating new steps and mobilising other group members to proceed with the project. Our study shows that texts accomplishing this task usually follow a three-part structure: They give reasons why writing to the group becomes necessary (“account”), they request the start or continuation of working (“projection”) and they present a personal contribution to the task (“achievement/input”). In cooperative online work, appropriate dialogical writing is a crucial skill. This “dialogical text competence”, as we call it, cannot be taken for granted; indeed it must be taught and practiced as it differs from competences necessary in face-to-face interaction or for writing texts in non-dialogical contexts. We therefore close our paper with a discussion of our results under the aspect of learning and facilitating dialogical text competence in contexts that offer practical experience.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of German Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:430 German & related languages
Uncontrolled Keywords:cooperative work; dialogical writing; e-learning; internet forum; text competence; writing routines; Online-Kommunikation; Foren-Kommunikation; Textkompetenz; dialogisches Schreiben; kooperatives Arbeiten
Language:German
Date:2016
Deposited On:27 Sep 2016 08:15
Last Modified:31 Aug 2017 00:00
Publisher:De Gruyter
ISSN:1433-9889
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2016-0021

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