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Vaccination of goats against Haemonchus contortus with the gut membrane proteins H11/H-gal-GP


Meier, Lorena; Torgerson, Paul R; Hertzberg, Hubertus (2016). Vaccination of goats against Haemonchus contortus with the gut membrane proteins H11/H-gal-GP. Veterinary Parasitology, 229:15-21.

Abstract

Forty goats, aged from 2 to 5 months were subjected to two different immunization protocols with a vaccine containing Haemonchus contortus gut membrane proteins H11/H-gal-GP to evaluate protection against H. contortus on pre-contaminated pastures. Goats were allocated to four groups of ten, three of them received their first vaccination before turnout. One group (V4) was then vaccinated at 4-week-intervals whereas another two groups (V6 and V6SEP) were vaccinated at 6-week-intervals. A control group (CTRL) remained unvaccinated. In May, after the second vaccination, all goats were turned out on pastures which had been previously contaminated with H. contortus eggs by seeder sheep for a period of six weeks. Goats of groups V4, V6 and CTRL were grazed together, whereas V6SEP was kept separately at an identical stocking rate. Clinical (PCV, FAMACHA, body weight), parasitological (faecal egg count, FEC) and serological (antibody titres) parameters were measured fortnightly. All goats were stabled in October, drenched with levamisole and two weeks later infected with 5000 L3 of H. contortus and slaughtered four weeks later for determination of abomasal worm burdens. Group mean FEC peaked 42–56 days after turnout. Significantly lower FEC were observed in V6SEP vs CTRL between D 28 and 70 (p < 0.01). Mean egg output of all groups decreased substantially and fluctuated at low levels until the end of the grazing period (D 154). Goats responded to vaccination with increasing antibody titres peaking after every booster. Mean worm burdens deriving from experimental infections were reduced by 89, 65 and 47% in groups V4, V6 and V6SEP, respectively, compared with the controls. The difference was significant for V4 (p < 0.01). Antibody titres measured 14 days before slaughter did not correlate statistically with the worm burdens. It was concluded that the vaccination protocol did not result in sufficient protection on pasture, as antibody titres were still low at the time the goats were exposed to larval contamination on pasture after turnout.

Abstract

Forty goats, aged from 2 to 5 months were subjected to two different immunization protocols with a vaccine containing Haemonchus contortus gut membrane proteins H11/H-gal-GP to evaluate protection against H. contortus on pre-contaminated pastures. Goats were allocated to four groups of ten, three of them received their first vaccination before turnout. One group (V4) was then vaccinated at 4-week-intervals whereas another two groups (V6 and V6SEP) were vaccinated at 6-week-intervals. A control group (CTRL) remained unvaccinated. In May, after the second vaccination, all goats were turned out on pastures which had been previously contaminated with H. contortus eggs by seeder sheep for a period of six weeks. Goats of groups V4, V6 and CTRL were grazed together, whereas V6SEP was kept separately at an identical stocking rate. Clinical (PCV, FAMACHA, body weight), parasitological (faecal egg count, FEC) and serological (antibody titres) parameters were measured fortnightly. All goats were stabled in October, drenched with levamisole and two weeks later infected with 5000 L3 of H. contortus and slaughtered four weeks later for determination of abomasal worm burdens. Group mean FEC peaked 42–56 days after turnout. Significantly lower FEC were observed in V6SEP vs CTRL between D 28 and 70 (p < 0.01). Mean egg output of all groups decreased substantially and fluctuated at low levels until the end of the grazing period (D 154). Goats responded to vaccination with increasing antibody titres peaking after every booster. Mean worm burdens deriving from experimental infections were reduced by 89, 65 and 47% in groups V4, V6 and V6SEP, respectively, compared with the controls. The difference was significant for V4 (p < 0.01). Antibody titres measured 14 days before slaughter did not correlate statistically with the worm burdens. It was concluded that the vaccination protocol did not result in sufficient protection on pasture, as antibody titres were still low at the time the goats were exposed to larval contamination on pasture after turnout.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:10 Oct 2016 13:32
Last Modified:31 Jan 2017 08:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0304-4017
Funders:COST Action FA0805
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2016.08.024

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