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Triggers, risk factors and clinico-pathological features of urticaria in dogs - a prospective observational study of 24 cases


Rostaher, A; Hofer-Inteeworn, N; Kümmerle-Fraune, C; Fischer, N M; Favrot, C (2017). Triggers, risk factors and clinico-pathological features of urticaria in dogs - a prospective observational study of 24 cases. Veterinary Dermatology, 28(1):38-e9.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Urticaria and anaphylaxis are frequently encountered in veterinary practice, but little is known about the causes and relative frequencies of these reactions. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES This study was designed to improve current knowledge on the triggers, risk factors and clinico-pathological features of urticaria. ANIMALS Twenty four dogs with signs of urticaria with or without anaphylaxis. METHODS The study included dogs with cutaneous immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. The cases were grouped by clinical severity into either an urticaria or an anaphylaxis group. All treatments and diagnostic tests (haematology, biochemical profile, allergy investigation) were recorded. A causality algorithm for urticaria and anaphylaxis (ALUA) was designed to determine the probability of the identified triggers and cofactors. Disease incidence, breed, age and gender predispositions were evaluated statistically. RESULTS Sixteen of 24 urticaria cases were associated with anaphylaxis whilst 8 of 24 were confined to the skin. The annual hospital incidence was 0.12%. Females seemed to be over-represented (2.4:1) and most of the dog breeds were pure breed (22 of 24), with Rhodesian ridgeback, boxer, beagle, Jack Russell terrier, French bulldog and Vizslas over-represented. In addition to skin lesions, the most frequently and severely affected organ systems were the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. The predominant blood abnormalities were elevated lipase and alanine aminotransferase values. Insects, food and drugs were the most commonly identified triggers. CONCLUSIONS To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the trigger factors and clinico-pathological features of dogs with urticaria in veterinary medicine. Insects, food and drugs were the most frequently detected triggers.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Urticaria and anaphylaxis are frequently encountered in veterinary practice, but little is known about the causes and relative frequencies of these reactions. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES This study was designed to improve current knowledge on the triggers, risk factors and clinico-pathological features of urticaria. ANIMALS Twenty four dogs with signs of urticaria with or without anaphylaxis. METHODS The study included dogs with cutaneous immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. The cases were grouped by clinical severity into either an urticaria or an anaphylaxis group. All treatments and diagnostic tests (haematology, biochemical profile, allergy investigation) were recorded. A causality algorithm for urticaria and anaphylaxis (ALUA) was designed to determine the probability of the identified triggers and cofactors. Disease incidence, breed, age and gender predispositions were evaluated statistically. RESULTS Sixteen of 24 urticaria cases were associated with anaphylaxis whilst 8 of 24 were confined to the skin. The annual hospital incidence was 0.12%. Females seemed to be over-represented (2.4:1) and most of the dog breeds were pure breed (22 of 24), with Rhodesian ridgeback, boxer, beagle, Jack Russell terrier, French bulldog and Vizslas over-represented. In addition to skin lesions, the most frequently and severely affected organ systems were the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. The predominant blood abnormalities were elevated lipase and alanine aminotransferase values. Insects, food and drugs were the most commonly identified triggers. CONCLUSIONS To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the trigger factors and clinico-pathological features of dogs with urticaria in veterinary medicine. Insects, food and drugs were the most frequently detected triggers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:February 2017
Deposited On:29 Sep 2016 09:41
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 20:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0959-4493
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vde.12342
PubMed ID:27425644

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