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A case-control field study on the relationships among type 2 diabetes, sleepiness and habitual caffeine intake


Urry, Emily; Jetter, Alexander; Holst, Sebastian C; Berger, Wolfgang; Spinas, Giatgen A; Langhans, Wolfgang; Landolt, Hans-Peter (2017). A case-control field study on the relationships among type 2 diabetes, sleepiness and habitual caffeine intake. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 31(2):233-242.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to examine the possible links between type 2 diabetes, daytime sleepiness, sleep quality and caffeine consumption. METHODS In this case-control field study, comparing type 2 diabetic (n=134) and non-type 2 diabetic (n=230) participants, subjects completed detailed and validated questionnaires to assess demographic status, health, daytime sleepiness, sleep quality and timing, diurnal preference, mistimed circadian rhythms and habitual caffeine intake. All participants gave saliva under standardised conditions for CYP1A2 genotyping and quantification of caffeine concentration. Hierarchical linear regression analyses examined whether type 2 diabetes status was associated with caffeine consumption. RESULTS Type 2 diabetic participants reported greater daytime sleepiness (p=0.001), a higher prevalence of sleep apnoea (p=0.005) and napping (p=0.008), and greater habitual caffeine intake (p<0.001), derived from the consumption of an extra cup of coffee each day. This finding was confirmed by higher saliva caffeine concentration at bedtime (p=0.01). Multiple regression analyses revealed that type 2 diabetes status was associated with higher self-reported caffeine consumption (p<0.02) and higher salivary caffeine (p<0.02). Next to male sex, type 2 diabetes status was the strongest predictor of caffeine intake. Subjective sleep and circadian estimates were similar between case and control groups. CONCLUSIONS Type 2 diabetic patients may self-medicate with caffeine to alleviate daytime sleepiness. High caffeine intake reflects a lifestyle factor that may be considered when promoting type 2 diabetes management.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to examine the possible links between type 2 diabetes, daytime sleepiness, sleep quality and caffeine consumption. METHODS In this case-control field study, comparing type 2 diabetic (n=134) and non-type 2 diabetic (n=230) participants, subjects completed detailed and validated questionnaires to assess demographic status, health, daytime sleepiness, sleep quality and timing, diurnal preference, mistimed circadian rhythms and habitual caffeine intake. All participants gave saliva under standardised conditions for CYP1A2 genotyping and quantification of caffeine concentration. Hierarchical linear regression analyses examined whether type 2 diabetes status was associated with caffeine consumption. RESULTS Type 2 diabetic participants reported greater daytime sleepiness (p=0.001), a higher prevalence of sleep apnoea (p=0.005) and napping (p=0.008), and greater habitual caffeine intake (p<0.001), derived from the consumption of an extra cup of coffee each day. This finding was confirmed by higher saliva caffeine concentration at bedtime (p=0.01). Multiple regression analyses revealed that type 2 diabetes status was associated with higher self-reported caffeine consumption (p<0.02) and higher salivary caffeine (p<0.02). Next to male sex, type 2 diabetes status was the strongest predictor of caffeine intake. Subjective sleep and circadian estimates were similar between case and control groups. CONCLUSIONS Type 2 diabetic patients may self-medicate with caffeine to alleviate daytime sleepiness. High caffeine intake reflects a lifestyle factor that may be considered when promoting type 2 diabetes management.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:13 Oct 2016 12:24
Last Modified:06 Mar 2017 11:47
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0269-8811
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881116668595
PubMed ID:27649774

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