Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

A New Pliocene Capybara (Rodentia, Caviidae) from Northern South America (Guajira, Colombia), and its Implications for the Great American Biotic Interchange


Pérez, María E; Vallejo-Pareja, María C; Carrillo, Juan D; Jaramillo, Carlos (2017). A New Pliocene Capybara (Rodentia, Caviidae) from Northern South America (Guajira, Colombia), and its Implications for the Great American Biotic Interchange. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, 24(1):111-125.

Abstract

One of the most striking components of the modern assemblage of South American mammals is the semiaquatic capybara (Caviidae, Hydrochoerinae), the biggest rodent in the world. The large hydrochoerines are recorded from the middle Miocene to the present, mainly in high latitudes of South America. Although less known, they are also recorded in low latitudes of South America, and in Central and North America. We report the first record of capybaras from the late Pliocene of Colombia, found in deposits of the Ware Formation, Guajira Peninsula in northeastern Colombia. We analyze the phylogenetic position within Caviidae, the possible environmental changes in the Guajira Peninsula, and the implications of this finding for the understanding of the Great American Biotic Interchange. The morphological and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the hydrochoerine of the Guajira Peninsula is a new species, ?Hydrochoeropsis wayuu, and this genus is most closely related to Phugatherium. According to the latest phylogenetic results, this clade is the sister group of the lineage of the recent capybaras (Neochoerus and Hydrochoerus). ?Hydrochoeropsis wayuu is the northernmost South American Pliocene hydrochoerine record and the nearest to the Panamanian bridge. The presence of this hydrochoerine, together with the fluvio-deltaic environment of the Ware Formation, suggests that during the late Pliocene, the environment that dominated the Guajira Peninsula was more humid and with permanent water bodies, in contrast with its modern desert habitats.

Abstract

One of the most striking components of the modern assemblage of South American mammals is the semiaquatic capybara (Caviidae, Hydrochoerinae), the biggest rodent in the world. The large hydrochoerines are recorded from the middle Miocene to the present, mainly in high latitudes of South America. Although less known, they are also recorded in low latitudes of South America, and in Central and North America. We report the first record of capybaras from the late Pliocene of Colombia, found in deposits of the Ware Formation, Guajira Peninsula in northeastern Colombia. We analyze the phylogenetic position within Caviidae, the possible environmental changes in the Guajira Peninsula, and the implications of this finding for the understanding of the Great American Biotic Interchange. The morphological and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the hydrochoerine of the Guajira Peninsula is a new species, ?Hydrochoeropsis wayuu, and this genus is most closely related to Phugatherium. According to the latest phylogenetic results, this clade is the sister group of the lineage of the recent capybaras (Neochoerus and Hydrochoerus). ?Hydrochoeropsis wayuu is the northernmost South American Pliocene hydrochoerine record and the nearest to the Panamanian bridge. The presence of this hydrochoerine, together with the fluvio-deltaic environment of the Ware Formation, suggests that during the late Pliocene, the environment that dominated the Guajira Peninsula was more humid and with permanent water bodies, in contrast with its modern desert habitats.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 13 Oct 2016
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:13 Oct 2016 12:08
Last Modified:11 Aug 2017 07:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1064-7554
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10914-016-9356-7

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB
View at publisher
Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 375kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations