Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Interposition of a connective tissue graft or a collagen matrix to enhance wound stability - an experimental study in dogs


Burkhardt, Rino; Ruiz Magaz, Vanessa; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Lang, Niklaus P (2016). Interposition of a connective tissue graft or a collagen matrix to enhance wound stability - an experimental study in dogs. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 43(4):366-373.

Abstract

AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a connective tissue graft (CTG) or a collagen matrix (CM) interpositioned between flaps and non-shedding hard surfaces on wound stability. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty bone dehiscence defects were prepared in five Beagle dogs. Three treatments were performed in 12 sites per dog: (1) repositioned flaps were sutured onto instrumented dentin surfaces (control), (2) repositioning of flaps with an interpositioned CTG and (3) repositioning of flaps with the application of a CM. To allow postoperative healing with n = 5 for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days before evaluation, the sutures were removed, incision lines retraced and tensile forces applied to the flaps. The minimum magnitude of forces required to detach the flaps from the wound bed was recorded. RESULTS After 1 week of healing, 6 N had to be applied to disrupt flaps from their wound bed in the CTG group. In the control group, a similar magnitude of resistance was achieved after 2 weeks (6.1 N). Flap resistance to tearing was highest in the CTG group (maximum 9.1 N) 2 weeks postoperatively. On the third postoperative day, the mean tearing forces of all groups differed significantly, displaying a 50% lower resistance to tearing in the CM compared to the CTG group. In comparison, flap resistance to tearing forces established earlier and in higher magnitude in sites with an interpositioned CTG than in flaps repositioned on dentin or CM. CONCLUSIONS Application of a CTG, sutured to a non-shedding hard surface, significantly increased flap resistance to tearing when applying disrupting forces compared to controls. A less pronounced effect was achieved by interpositioning of a CM.

Abstract

AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a connective tissue graft (CTG) or a collagen matrix (CM) interpositioned between flaps and non-shedding hard surfaces on wound stability. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty bone dehiscence defects were prepared in five Beagle dogs. Three treatments were performed in 12 sites per dog: (1) repositioned flaps were sutured onto instrumented dentin surfaces (control), (2) repositioning of flaps with an interpositioned CTG and (3) repositioning of flaps with the application of a CM. To allow postoperative healing with n = 5 for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days before evaluation, the sutures were removed, incision lines retraced and tensile forces applied to the flaps. The minimum magnitude of forces required to detach the flaps from the wound bed was recorded. RESULTS After 1 week of healing, 6 N had to be applied to disrupt flaps from their wound bed in the CTG group. In the control group, a similar magnitude of resistance was achieved after 2 weeks (6.1 N). Flap resistance to tearing was highest in the CTG group (maximum 9.1 N) 2 weeks postoperatively. On the third postoperative day, the mean tearing forces of all groups differed significantly, displaying a 50% lower resistance to tearing in the CM compared to the CTG group. In comparison, flap resistance to tearing forces established earlier and in higher magnitude in sites with an interpositioned CTG than in flaps repositioned on dentin or CM. CONCLUSIONS Application of a CTG, sutured to a non-shedding hard surface, significantly increased flap resistance to tearing when applying disrupting forces compared to controls. A less pronounced effect was achieved by interpositioning of a CM.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 13 Oct 2016
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2016
Deposited On:13 Oct 2016 14:41
Last Modified:29 Mar 2017 00:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0303-6979
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpe.12526
PubMed ID:26847722

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 479kB
View at publisher
Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 346kB

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations