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Putting the Pieces Back Together Again: Contest Webs for Large-Scale Problem Solving - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Malone, Thomas W; Nickerson, Jeffrey V; Laubacher, Robert J; Fisher, Laur Hesse; De Boer, Patrick; Han, Yue; Towne, Ben (2017). Putting the Pieces Back Together Again: Contest Webs for Large-Scale Problem Solving. In: 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW 2017), Portland, OR, 25 February 2017 - 1 March 2017.

Abstract

A key issue, whenever people work together to solve a complex problem, is how to divide the problem into parts done by different people and combine the parts into a solution for the whole problem. This paper presents a novel way of doing this with groups of contests called contest webs. Based on the analogy of supply chains for physical products, the method provides incentives for people to (a) reuse work done by themselves and others, (b) simultaneously explore multiple ways of combining interchangeable parts, and (c) work on parts of the problem where they can contribute the most.
The paper also describes a field test of this method in an online community of over 50,000 people who are developing proposals for what to do about global climate change. The early results suggest that the method can, indeed, work at scale as intended.

Abstract

A key issue, whenever people work together to solve a complex problem, is how to divide the problem into parts done by different people and combine the parts into a solution for the whole problem. This paper presents a novel way of doing this with groups of contests called contest webs. Based on the analogy of supply chains for physical products, the method provides incentives for people to (a) reuse work done by themselves and others, (b) simultaneously explore multiple ways of combining interchangeable parts, and (c) work on parts of the problem where they can contribute the most.
The paper also describes a field test of this method in an online community of over 50,000 people who are developing proposals for what to do about global climate change. The early results suggest that the method can, indeed, work at scale as intended.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:1 March 2017
Deposited On:02 Nov 2016 15:56
Last Modified:29 Mar 2017 07:46
Publisher:s.n.
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:13963

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Filetype: PDF (publication date: 01.03.2017)
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