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Vigilance and wake EEG architecture in simulated hyperammonaemia: a pilot study on the effects of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate (LOLA) and caffeine


Garrido, Maria; Skorucak, Jelena; Raduazzo, Daniela; Turco, Matteo; Spinelli, Giuseppe; Angeli, Paolo; Amodio, Piero; Achermann, Peter; Montagnese, Sara (2016). Vigilance and wake EEG architecture in simulated hyperammonaemia: a pilot study on the effects of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate (LOLA) and caffeine. Metabolic brain disease, 31(4):965-974.

Abstract

UNLABELLED Hyperammonaemia/mild hepatic encephalopathy (HE) can be simulated by the oral administration of a so-called amino acid challenge (AAC). This study sought to assess the effects of the AAC alone and in combination with either ammonia-lowering [L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA)] or vigilance-enhancing medication (caffeine). Six patients with cirrhosis (5 males; 61.3 ± 9.2 years; 5 Child A, 1 Child B) and six healthy volunteers (5 males; 49.8 ± 10.6 years) were studied between 08:00 and 19:00 on Monday of three consecutive weeks. The following indices were obtained: hourly capillary ammonia, hourly subjective sleepiness, paper & pencil/computerized psychometry and wake electroencephalography (EEG) at 12:00, i.e. at the time of the maximum expected effect of the AAC. RESULTS On average, patients had worse neuropsychological performance and slower EEG than healthy volunteers in all conditions but differences did not reach significance. In healthy volunteers, the post-AAC increase in capillary ammonia levels was contained by both the administration of LOLA and of caffeine (significant differences between 10:00 and 14:00 h). The administration of caffeine also resulted in a reduction in subjective sleepiness and in the amplitude of the EEG on several frontal/temporal-occipital sites (p < 0.05; paired t-test). Changes in ammonia levels, subjective sleepiness and the EEG in the three conditions were less obvious in patients. In conclusion, both LOLA and caffeine contained the AAC-induced increase in capillary ammonia, especially in healthy volunteers. Caffeine also counteracted the AAC effects on sleepiness/EEG amplitude. The association of ammonia-lowering and vigilance-enhancing medication in the management of HE is worthy of further study.

Abstract

UNLABELLED Hyperammonaemia/mild hepatic encephalopathy (HE) can be simulated by the oral administration of a so-called amino acid challenge (AAC). This study sought to assess the effects of the AAC alone and in combination with either ammonia-lowering [L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA)] or vigilance-enhancing medication (caffeine). Six patients with cirrhosis (5 males; 61.3 ± 9.2 years; 5 Child A, 1 Child B) and six healthy volunteers (5 males; 49.8 ± 10.6 years) were studied between 08:00 and 19:00 on Monday of three consecutive weeks. The following indices were obtained: hourly capillary ammonia, hourly subjective sleepiness, paper & pencil/computerized psychometry and wake electroencephalography (EEG) at 12:00, i.e. at the time of the maximum expected effect of the AAC. RESULTS On average, patients had worse neuropsychological performance and slower EEG than healthy volunteers in all conditions but differences did not reach significance. In healthy volunteers, the post-AAC increase in capillary ammonia levels was contained by both the administration of LOLA and of caffeine (significant differences between 10:00 and 14:00 h). The administration of caffeine also resulted in a reduction in subjective sleepiness and in the amplitude of the EEG on several frontal/temporal-occipital sites (p < 0.05; paired t-test). Changes in ammonia levels, subjective sleepiness and the EEG in the three conditions were less obvious in patients. In conclusion, both LOLA and caffeine contained the AAC-induced increase in capillary ammonia, especially in healthy volunteers. Caffeine also counteracted the AAC effects on sleepiness/EEG amplitude. The association of ammonia-lowering and vigilance-enhancing medication in the management of HE is worthy of further study.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2016
Deposited On:03 Nov 2016 08:29
Last Modified:03 Nov 2016 08:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0885-7490
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11011-016-9835-9
PubMed ID:27193025

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