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Unexplained bleeding as primary clinical complaint in dogs infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Glaus, Toni M; Sigrist, Nadja; Hofer-Inteeworn, Nathalie; Kuemmerle-Fraune, C; Mueller, C; Geissweid, K; Beckmann, Karin; Wenger, Michelle; Novo Matos, J (2016). Unexplained bleeding as primary clinical complaint in dogs infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 158(10):701-709.

Abstract

Unexplained bleeding was the primary clinical complaint in 15 dogs diagnosed with A. vasorum and was observed in the mouth, as external bleeding, as large subcutaneous hematoma, as hemoptysis, in the brain, post ovariectomy, as epistaxis, in the anterior ocular chamber and on a tracheal intubation tube. In 8 dogs the cause of bleeding initially was suspected to be a minor trauma or a surgical complication, and various surgical approaches had been undertaken to eliminate the problem. In only 3 dogs respiratory signs were observed before the bleeding prompted referral. The median time elapsed between the first recognized clinical signs attributed to A. vasorum until diagnosis was 2 weeks (range1 day to 4 months). Four dogs died, 3 on the day of admission and 1 dog 4 days after admission. Suspected causes of death were respiratory failure and cerebral hemorrhage in 2 dogs each. Four dogs had been pre-treated with NSAIDs; of these, 2 dogs developed severe hemoptysis (1 died), 1 dog developed brain hemorrhage (and died), and 1 dog developed a large subcutaneous hematoma with marked anemia. Bleeding at various sites may be the only recognized abnormality in A. vasorum infection. Without a high index of suspicion, the diagnosis and appropriate therapy may be delayed to the point of a fatal outcome. Tests of coagulation were quite variable and the cause of bleeding likely multifactorial.

Abstract

Unexplained bleeding was the primary clinical complaint in 15 dogs diagnosed with A. vasorum and was observed in the mouth, as external bleeding, as large subcutaneous hematoma, as hemoptysis, in the brain, post ovariectomy, as epistaxis, in the anterior ocular chamber and on a tracheal intubation tube. In 8 dogs the cause of bleeding initially was suspected to be a minor trauma or a surgical complication, and various surgical approaches had been undertaken to eliminate the problem. In only 3 dogs respiratory signs were observed before the bleeding prompted referral. The median time elapsed between the first recognized clinical signs attributed to A. vasorum until diagnosis was 2 weeks (range1 day to 4 months). Four dogs died, 3 on the day of admission and 1 dog 4 days after admission. Suspected causes of death were respiratory failure and cerebral hemorrhage in 2 dogs each. Four dogs had been pre-treated with NSAIDs; of these, 2 dogs developed severe hemoptysis (1 died), 1 dog developed brain hemorrhage (and died), and 1 dog developed a large subcutaneous hematoma with marked anemia. Bleeding at various sites may be the only recognized abnormality in A. vasorum infection. Without a high index of suspicion, the diagnosis and appropriate therapy may be delayed to the point of a fatal outcome. Tests of coagulation were quite variable and the cause of bleeding likely multifactorial.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Unerklärliche Blutung als primäres klinisches Leiden bei Hunden mit einer Angiostrongylus vasorum Infektion
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:DIC; Lymphozytose; Thrombozytopathie; Thrombozytopenie; lymphocytosis; pulmonary hypertension; pulmonäre Hypertonie; thrombocytopathy; thrombocytopenia
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:04 Nov 2016 06:58
Last Modified:14 Dec 2016 10:43
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.17236/sat00088
PubMed ID:27707683

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