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Effect of locomotor training on exhaustion of leg muscle activity in chronic complete spinal cord injury


Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Dietz, Volker; Bolliger, Marc (2017). Effect of locomotor training on exhaustion of leg muscle activity in chronic complete spinal cord injury. Journal of Neurotrauma, 34(15):2375-2378.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle EMG exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in non-trained patients usually around six months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to a non-trained patient no more EMG exhaustion was observed in a very chronic stage. At this time (12 years after injury) a basic locomotor pattern of leg muscle activity of reduced amplitude could still be elicited but it was resistant to exhaustion and unchanged in amplitude after 12 minutes of assisted stepping. It is suggested that fatigue-resistant motor units prevail at this stage and can still be activated during stepping due to the training.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle EMG exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in non-trained patients usually around six months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to a non-trained patient no more EMG exhaustion was observed in a very chronic stage. At this time (12 years after injury) a basic locomotor pattern of leg muscle activity of reduced amplitude could still be elicited but it was resistant to exhaustion and unchanged in amplitude after 12 minutes of assisted stepping. It is suggested that fatigue-resistant motor units prevail at this stage and can still be activated during stepping due to the training.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:11 Nov 2016 13:12
Last Modified:22 Jul 2017 01:00
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:0897-7151
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2016.4627
PubMed ID:27736315

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