Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transgenerational aspects of former Swiss child laborers: do second generations suffer from their parents' adverse early-life experiences?


Küffer, Andreas Lorenz; Thoma, Myriam V; Maercker, Andreas (2016). Transgenerational aspects of former Swiss child laborers: do second generations suffer from their parents' adverse early-life experiences? European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 7:30804.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Recent research suggests that childhood adversity exerts a lasting impact not only on the affected individuals but also on their offspring. Little is known about the role of parental rearing behavior in the transgenerational conveyance of parental childhood adversity and filial psychological health.

OBJECTIVE
Hence, it was the aim of the current study to investigate the relationship between parental rearing behavior of former Swiss indentured child laborers ("Verdingkinder") and psychological health of their adult offspring.

METHODS
We applied a two-generation control-group design with two parental samples (n=16, former "Verdingkinder," Mage=76.13, SD=6.81 and n=19, parental controls, Mage=72.63, SD=5.96) and their offspring (n=21, former "Verdingkinder" offspring, Mage=52.91, SD=5.90, and n=29 offspring controls, Mage=44.55, SD=7.71). Parental rearing behavior, childhood trauma, and psychological health were assessed with questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Bayesian analyses, where Bayes factors (BF) of 3 or higher were considered as substantial evidence for the tested hypotheses.

RESULTS
We found that "Verdingkinder" offspring reported more physical abuse (BF10=5.197) and higher total childhood trauma exposure (BF10=2.476). They described both their fathers (BF10=14.246) and mothers (BF10=24.153) as less emotional and their mothers as more punitive (BF10=18.725). An increased sense of reflection, for instance, one's ability to take different perspectives, was found in the offspring controls (BF10=5.245). Furthermore, exploratory analyses revealed that lower perceived familial emotionality was associated with higher psychopathology (all BF10=10.471) and higher pessimism (all BF10=5.396).

DISCUSSION
Our data provide cross-sectional evidence of a meaningful transgenerational relationship between parental childhood adversity, dysfunctional rearing behavior, and psychological health of offspring. Prospective studies are needed to investigate these findings in a longitudinal setting.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Recent research suggests that childhood adversity exerts a lasting impact not only on the affected individuals but also on their offspring. Little is known about the role of parental rearing behavior in the transgenerational conveyance of parental childhood adversity and filial psychological health.

OBJECTIVE
Hence, it was the aim of the current study to investigate the relationship between parental rearing behavior of former Swiss indentured child laborers ("Verdingkinder") and psychological health of their adult offspring.

METHODS
We applied a two-generation control-group design with two parental samples (n=16, former "Verdingkinder," Mage=76.13, SD=6.81 and n=19, parental controls, Mage=72.63, SD=5.96) and their offspring (n=21, former "Verdingkinder" offspring, Mage=52.91, SD=5.90, and n=29 offspring controls, Mage=44.55, SD=7.71). Parental rearing behavior, childhood trauma, and psychological health were assessed with questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Bayesian analyses, where Bayes factors (BF) of 3 or higher were considered as substantial evidence for the tested hypotheses.

RESULTS
We found that "Verdingkinder" offspring reported more physical abuse (BF10=5.197) and higher total childhood trauma exposure (BF10=2.476). They described both their fathers (BF10=14.246) and mothers (BF10=24.153) as less emotional and their mothers as more punitive (BF10=18.725). An increased sense of reflection, for instance, one's ability to take different perspectives, was found in the offspring controls (BF10=5.245). Furthermore, exploratory analyses revealed that lower perceived familial emotionality was associated with higher psychopathology (all BF10=10.471) and higher pessimism (all BF10=5.396).

DISCUSSION
Our data provide cross-sectional evidence of a meaningful transgenerational relationship between parental childhood adversity, dysfunctional rearing behavior, and psychological health of offspring. Prospective studies are needed to investigate these findings in a longitudinal setting.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

17 downloads since deposited on 16 Nov 2016
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:16 Nov 2016 09:35
Last Modified:05 Aug 2017 01:06
Publisher:Co-Action Publishing
ISSN:2000-8066
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3402/ejpt.v7.30804
PubMed ID:27784510

Download

Download PDF  'Transgenerational aspects of former Swiss child laborers: do second generations suffer from their parents' adverse early-life experiences?'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 463kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)