Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Electrophysiological Evidence for Alternative Motor Networks in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder


Hackius, Marc; Werth, Esther; Sürücü, Oguzkan; Baumann, Christian R; Imbach, Lukas L (2016). Electrophysiological Evidence for Alternative Motor Networks in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Journal of Neuroscience, 36(46):11795-11800.

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show mostly unimpaired motor behavior during REM sleep, which contrasts strongly to coexistent nocturnal bradykinesia. The reason for this sudden amelioration of motor control in REM sleep is unknown, however. We set out to determine whether movements during REM sleep are processed by different motor networks than movements in the waking state. We recorded local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and scalp EEG (modified 10/20 montage) during sleep in humans with PD and RBD. Time-locked event-related β band oscillations were calculated during movements in REM sleep compared with movements in the waking state and during NREM sleep. Spectral analysis of STN local field potentials revealed elevated β power during REM sleep compared with NREM sleep and β power in REM sleep reached levels similar as in the waking state. Event-related analysis showed time-locked β desynchronization during WAKE movements. In contrast, we found significantly elevated β activity before and during movements in REM sleep and NREM sleep. Corticosubthalamic coherence was reduced during REM and NREM movements. We conclude that sleep-related movements are not processed by the same corticobasal ganglia network as movements in the waking state. Therefore, the well-known seemingly normal motor performance during RBD in PD patients might be generated by activating alternative motor networks for movement initiation. These findings support the hypothesis that pathological movement-inhibiting basal ganglia networks in PD patients are bypassed during sleep. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study provides evidence that nocturnal movements during REM sleep in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are not processed by the same corticobasal ganglia network as movements in the waking state. This implicates the existence of an alternative motor network that does not depend directly on the availability of l-Dopa in the basal ganglia. These findings further indicate that some PD patients are able to perform movements in the dopamine depleted state, possibly by bypassing the pathological basal ganglia network. The existence and direct activation of such alternative motor networks might finally have potential therapeutic effects for PD patients.

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show mostly unimpaired motor behavior during REM sleep, which contrasts strongly to coexistent nocturnal bradykinesia. The reason for this sudden amelioration of motor control in REM sleep is unknown, however. We set out to determine whether movements during REM sleep are processed by different motor networks than movements in the waking state. We recorded local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and scalp EEG (modified 10/20 montage) during sleep in humans with PD and RBD. Time-locked event-related β band oscillations were calculated during movements in REM sleep compared with movements in the waking state and during NREM sleep. Spectral analysis of STN local field potentials revealed elevated β power during REM sleep compared with NREM sleep and β power in REM sleep reached levels similar as in the waking state. Event-related analysis showed time-locked β desynchronization during WAKE movements. In contrast, we found significantly elevated β activity before and during movements in REM sleep and NREM sleep. Corticosubthalamic coherence was reduced during REM and NREM movements. We conclude that sleep-related movements are not processed by the same corticobasal ganglia network as movements in the waking state. Therefore, the well-known seemingly normal motor performance during RBD in PD patients might be generated by activating alternative motor networks for movement initiation. These findings support the hypothesis that pathological movement-inhibiting basal ganglia networks in PD patients are bypassed during sleep. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study provides evidence that nocturnal movements during REM sleep in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are not processed by the same corticobasal ganglia network as movements in the waking state. This implicates the existence of an alternative motor network that does not depend directly on the availability of l-Dopa in the basal ganglia. These findings further indicate that some PD patients are able to perform movements in the dopamine depleted state, possibly by bypassing the pathological basal ganglia network. The existence and direct activation of such alternative motor networks might finally have potential therapeutic effects for PD patients.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
2 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
2 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

43 downloads since deposited on 18 Nov 2016
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:16 November 2016
Deposited On:18 Nov 2016 14:02
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 10:44
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2546-16.2016
PubMed ID:27852786

Download

Download PDF  'Electrophysiological Evidence for Alternative Motor Networks in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher