Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evaluation of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone to test thyroid function in dogs suspected of having hypothyroidism


Boretti, Felicitas S; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Nadja S; Favrot, Claude; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Reusch, Claudia E (2006). Evaluation of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone to test thyroid function in dogs suspected of having hypothyroidism. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 67(12):2012-2016.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of recombinant human (rh) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in dogs with suspected hypothyroidism.
ANIMALS: 64 dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism.
PROCEDURES: Dogs received rhTSH (75 microg/dog, IV) at a dose independent of their body weight. Blood samples were taken before and 6 hours after rhTSH administration for determination of total serum thyroxine (T(4)) concentration. Dogs were placed into 1 of 3 groups as follows: those with normal (ie, poststimulation values indicative of euthyroidism), unchanged (ie, poststimulation values indicative of hypothyroidism; no thyroid gland stimulation), or intermediate (ie, poststimulation values between unchanged and normal values) post-TSH T(4) concentrations. Serum canine TSH (cTSH) concentration was determined in prestimulation serum (ie, before TSH administration).
RESULTS: 14, 35, and 15 dogs had unchanged, normal, and intermediate post-TSH T(4) concentrations, respectively. Basal T(4) and post-TSH T(4) concentrations were significantly different among groups. On the basis of basal serum T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone, 1 euthyroid (normal post-TSH T(4), low basal T(4), and high cTSH concentrations) and 1 hypothyroid dog (unchanged post-TSH T(4) concentration and low to with-in reference range T(4) and cTSH concentrations) would have been misinterpreted as hypothyroid and euthyroid, respectively. Nine of the 15 dogs with intermediate post-TSHT(4) concentrations had received medication known to affect thyroid function prior to the test, and 2 of them had severe nonthyroidal disease.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The TSH-stimulation test with rhTSH is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess thyroid function in selected dogs in which a diagnosis of hypothyroidism cannot be based on basal T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of recombinant human (rh) thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in dogs with suspected hypothyroidism.
ANIMALS: 64 dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism.
PROCEDURES: Dogs received rhTSH (75 microg/dog, IV) at a dose independent of their body weight. Blood samples were taken before and 6 hours after rhTSH administration for determination of total serum thyroxine (T(4)) concentration. Dogs were placed into 1 of 3 groups as follows: those with normal (ie, poststimulation values indicative of euthyroidism), unchanged (ie, poststimulation values indicative of hypothyroidism; no thyroid gland stimulation), or intermediate (ie, poststimulation values between unchanged and normal values) post-TSH T(4) concentrations. Serum canine TSH (cTSH) concentration was determined in prestimulation serum (ie, before TSH administration).
RESULTS: 14, 35, and 15 dogs had unchanged, normal, and intermediate post-TSH T(4) concentrations, respectively. Basal T(4) and post-TSH T(4) concentrations were significantly different among groups. On the basis of basal serum T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone, 1 euthyroid (normal post-TSH T(4), low basal T(4), and high cTSH concentrations) and 1 hypothyroid dog (unchanged post-TSH T(4) concentration and low to with-in reference range T(4) and cTSH concentrations) would have been misinterpreted as hypothyroid and euthyroid, respectively. Nine of the 15 dogs with intermediate post-TSHT(4) concentrations had received medication known to affect thyroid function prior to the test, and 2 of them had severe nonthyroidal disease.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The TSH-stimulation test with rhTSH is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess thyroid function in selected dogs in which a diagnosis of hypothyroidism cannot be based on basal T(4) and cTSH concentrations alone.

Statistics

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:28 Nov 2016 12:51
Last Modified:28 Nov 2016 12:51
Publisher:American Veterinary Medical Association
ISSN:0002-9645
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.67.12.2012
PubMed ID:17144802

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations