Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Going beyond work and family: A longitudinal study on the role of leisure in the work-life interplay


Knecht, Michaela; Wiese, Bettina S; Freund, Alexandra M (2016). Going beyond work and family: A longitudinal study on the role of leisure in the work-life interplay. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 37(7):1061-1077.

Abstract

Going beyond the relation of work and family, the present three-wave longitudinal study spanning one year assessed different forms of conflict and facilitation between leisure and the life domains work and family and their relation to subjective well-being. A sample of N = 277 employed men and women reported their perceived conflict and facilitation between leisure, work, and family and subjective well-being. Results suggest that leisure is a source of facilitation for work and family, and, at the same time, a major recipient of conflict from work and family. Moreover, leisure conflict was negatively correlated and leisure facilitation was positively associated with concurrent subjective well-being. Both conflict and facilitation between all three life domains remained highly stable over the course of one year. Only few and non-systematic lagged effects were found, indicating that the variance of the stability of the constructs and their relations over time leave little room for longitudinal predictions. Taken together, the study demonstrates that, similar to work–family relations, conflict and facilitation with the leisure domain are also associated with subjective well-being and remain highly stable over the course of a year in the lives of young and middle-aged adults.

Abstract

Going beyond the relation of work and family, the present three-wave longitudinal study spanning one year assessed different forms of conflict and facilitation between leisure and the life domains work and family and their relation to subjective well-being. A sample of N = 277 employed men and women reported their perceived conflict and facilitation between leisure, work, and family and subjective well-being. Results suggest that leisure is a source of facilitation for work and family, and, at the same time, a major recipient of conflict from work and family. Moreover, leisure conflict was negatively correlated and leisure facilitation was positively associated with concurrent subjective well-being. Both conflict and facilitation between all three life domains remained highly stable over the course of one year. Only few and non-systematic lagged effects were found, indicating that the variance of the stability of the constructs and their relations over time leave little room for longitudinal predictions. Taken together, the study demonstrates that, similar to work–family relations, conflict and facilitation with the leisure domain are also associated with subjective well-being and remain highly stable over the course of a year in the lives of young and middle-aged adults.

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2016
Deposited On:29 Nov 2016 15:12
Last Modified:29 Nov 2016 15:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0894-3796
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/job.2098

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations