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A cost-effectiveness analysis of nivolumab versus docetaxel for advanced nonsquamous NSCLC including PD-L1 testing


Matter-Walstra, Klazien; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Aebi, Stefan; Dedes, Konstantin; Diebold, Joachim; Pietrini, Mario; Klingbiel, Dirk; von Moos, Roger; Gautschi, Oliver; Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (2016). A cost-effectiveness analysis of nivolumab versus docetaxel for advanced nonsquamous NSCLC including PD-L1 testing. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 11(11):1846-1855.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Nivolumab (NIV) was recently approved in several countries for patients with pretreated advanced NSCLC. NIV is not cost-effective compared with docetaxel (DOC) for the treatment of squamous NSCLC. However, its cost-effectiveness for nonsquamous NSCLC and the consequences of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) testing are unknown.
METHODS: This literature-based health economic study used CheckMate-057 trial data to model the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of NIV versus DOC in the Swiss health care setting. The effect of PD-L1 positivity for patient selection was assessed.
RESULTS: In the base case model, NIV (mean cost CHF66,208; mean effect 0.69 quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) compared with DOC (mean cost CHF37,618; mean effect 0.53 QALYs) resulted in an ICER of CHF177,478/QALY gained. Treating only patients with PD-L1-positive tumors (threshold ≥10%) with NIV compared with treating all patients with DOC produced a base case ICER of CHF124,891/QALY gained. Reduced drug price, dose, or treatment duration decreased the ICER partly below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. Health state utilities strongly influenced cost-effectiveness.
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with DOC, NIV is not cost-effective for the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC at current prices in the Swiss health care setting. Price reduction or PD-L1 testing and selection of patients for NIV on the basis of test positivity improves cost-effectiveness compared with DOC.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Nivolumab (NIV) was recently approved in several countries for patients with pretreated advanced NSCLC. NIV is not cost-effective compared with docetaxel (DOC) for the treatment of squamous NSCLC. However, its cost-effectiveness for nonsquamous NSCLC and the consequences of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) testing are unknown.
METHODS: This literature-based health economic study used CheckMate-057 trial data to model the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of NIV versus DOC in the Swiss health care setting. The effect of PD-L1 positivity for patient selection was assessed.
RESULTS: In the base case model, NIV (mean cost CHF66,208; mean effect 0.69 quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) compared with DOC (mean cost CHF37,618; mean effect 0.53 QALYs) resulted in an ICER of CHF177,478/QALY gained. Treating only patients with PD-L1-positive tumors (threshold ≥10%) with NIV compared with treating all patients with DOC produced a base case ICER of CHF124,891/QALY gained. Reduced drug price, dose, or treatment duration decreased the ICER partly below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. Health state utilities strongly influenced cost-effectiveness.
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with DOC, NIV is not cost-effective for the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC at current prices in the Swiss health care setting. Price reduction or PD-L1 testing and selection of patients for NIV on the basis of test positivity improves cost-effectiveness compared with DOC.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gynecology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:01 Dec 2016 08:28
Last Modified:01 Feb 2017 10:54
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1556-0864
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtho.2016.05.032
PubMed ID:27311996

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