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Character strengths predict resilience over and above positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support, self-esteem, and life satisfaction


Martínez-Martí, María Luisa; Ruch, Willibald (2017). Character strengths predict resilience over and above positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Journal of Positive Psychology, 12(2):110-119.

Abstract

The incremental value of character strengths in the prediction of resilience, after the effects of other
well-known resilience-related factors (i.e. positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support,
self-esteem, life satisfaction) and sociodemographic variables are accounted for, is examined.
Using a cross-sectional design, participants (N = 363 adults) completed online measures of
character strengths, resilience, and resilience-related factors. A principal component analysis of
character strengths was conducted and five factors were extracted, which could be interpreted
as emotional, interpersonal, intellectual, restraint, and theological strengths. All strengths factors,
except theological strengths, yielded significant positive correlations with resilience. A hierarchical
regression showed that strengths predicted an additional 3% of the variance in resilience over and
above sociodemographic variables, positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support, self-
esteem, and life satisfaction. Emotional strengths and strengths of restraint were significant positive
predictors. Implications, limitations, and future research are discussed.

Abstract

The incremental value of character strengths in the prediction of resilience, after the effects of other
well-known resilience-related factors (i.e. positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support,
self-esteem, life satisfaction) and sociodemographic variables are accounted for, is examined.
Using a cross-sectional design, participants (N = 363 adults) completed online measures of
character strengths, resilience, and resilience-related factors. A principal component analysis of
character strengths was conducted and five factors were extracted, which could be interpreted
as emotional, interpersonal, intellectual, restraint, and theological strengths. All strengths factors,
except theological strengths, yielded significant positive correlations with resilience. A hierarchical
regression showed that strengths predicted an additional 3% of the variance in resilience over and
above sociodemographic variables, positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support, self-
esteem, and life satisfaction. Emotional strengths and strengths of restraint were significant positive
predictors. Implications, limitations, and future research are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:30 Nov 2016 14:50
Last Modified:30 Nov 2016 14:50
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1743-9760
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2016.1163403

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