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Ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep and goats


Braun, Ueli; Rihs, T; Schefer, U (1992). Ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep and goats. Veterinary Record, 130(16):343-349.

Abstract

The clinical findings in 37 sheep and goats with acute ruminal lactic acidosis included a disturbed general condition characterised by anorexia, apathy, teeth grinding and muscle twitching, ruminal stasis, and the excretion of soupy or watery faeces. The ruminal fluid of affected animals was milky, had a sour odour and a low pH. There was a predominance of Gram-positive bacteria in smears of ruminal fluid. In comparison with 10 control animals, the rumen fluid of 23 sheep with ruminal lactic acidosis had higher lactic acid and lower volatile fatty acid concentrations. In addition, the affected animals often had haemoconcentration and metabolic acidosis. Treatment included single or repeated transfer of ruminal fluid from healthy cows and, depending on the severity, the administration of antacids, yeast and chlortetracycline, and the intravenous infusion of isotonic sodium chloride and 5 per cent sodium bicarbonate solutions. Of the 37 treated sheep and goats, four died within 24 hours, and three others were euthanased after one, two and three days because their condition rapidly deteriorated. Thirty animals were discharged one to nine days after treatment. Twenty-nine of them (78.4 per cent) recovered completely but one was euthanased later.

Abstract

The clinical findings in 37 sheep and goats with acute ruminal lactic acidosis included a disturbed general condition characterised by anorexia, apathy, teeth grinding and muscle twitching, ruminal stasis, and the excretion of soupy or watery faeces. The ruminal fluid of affected animals was milky, had a sour odour and a low pH. There was a predominance of Gram-positive bacteria in smears of ruminal fluid. In comparison with 10 control animals, the rumen fluid of 23 sheep with ruminal lactic acidosis had higher lactic acid and lower volatile fatty acid concentrations. In addition, the affected animals often had haemoconcentration and metabolic acidosis. Treatment included single or repeated transfer of ruminal fluid from healthy cows and, depending on the severity, the administration of antacids, yeast and chlortetracycline, and the intravenous infusion of isotonic sodium chloride and 5 per cent sodium bicarbonate solutions. Of the 37 treated sheep and goats, four died within 24 hours, and three others were euthanased after one, two and three days because their condition rapidly deteriorated. Thirty animals were discharged one to nine days after treatment. Twenty-nine of them (78.4 per cent) recovered completely but one was euthanased later.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:18 April 1992
Deposited On:02 Dec 2016 13:00
Last Modified:04 Dec 2016 06:15
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0042-4900
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/vr.130.16.343
PubMed ID:1595174

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