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Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Early Repolarization Pattern and QRS-Fragmentation in High-Risk Patients With Brugada Syndrome


Conte, Giulio; de Asmundis, Carlo; Sieira, Juan; Ciconte, Giuseppe; Di Giovanni, Giacomo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Casado-Arroyo, Ruben; Baltogiannis, Giannis; Ströker, Erwin; Irfan, Ghazala; Pappaert, Gudrun; Auricchio, Angelo; Brugada, Pedro (2016). Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Early Repolarization Pattern and QRS-Fragmentation in High-Risk Patients With Brugada Syndrome. Circulation Journal, 80(10):2109-2116.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The phenotypic heterogeneity of Brugada syndrome (BrS) can lead some patients to show an additional inferolateral early repolarization pattern (ERP), or fragmented QRS (f-QRS). The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical impact of f-QRS, ERP or combined f-QRS/ERP in high-risk patients with BrS. METHODS AND RESULTS Patients with spontaneous or drug-induced BrS and an indication to receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were considered eligible for this study. From 1992 to 2012, a total of 176 consecutive patients with BrS underwent ICD implantation. Among them, 48 subjects (27.3%) presented with additional depolarization and/or repolarization abnormalities. f-QRS was found in 29 (16.5%), ERP in 15 (8.5%), and combined f-QRS/ERP in 4 patients (2.3%). After a mean follow-up of 95.2±51.9 months, spontaneous sustained ventricular arrhythmias were documented in 8 patients (16.7%). No significant difference was found in the rate of appropriate shocks between patients presenting with f-QRS or ERP and those without abnormalities. Patients with both f-QRS and ERP had a significantly higher rate of appropriate shocks (HR: 4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-19.7; P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS Fragmented QRS and ERP are common ECG findings in high-risk BrS patients, occurring in up to 27% of cases. When combined, f-QRS and ERP confer a higher risk of appropriate ICD interventions during a very long-term follow-up. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2109-2116).

Abstract

BACKGROUND The phenotypic heterogeneity of Brugada syndrome (BrS) can lead some patients to show an additional inferolateral early repolarization pattern (ERP), or fragmented QRS (f-QRS). The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical impact of f-QRS, ERP or combined f-QRS/ERP in high-risk patients with BrS. METHODS AND RESULTS Patients with spontaneous or drug-induced BrS and an indication to receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were considered eligible for this study. From 1992 to 2012, a total of 176 consecutive patients with BrS underwent ICD implantation. Among them, 48 subjects (27.3%) presented with additional depolarization and/or repolarization abnormalities. f-QRS was found in 29 (16.5%), ERP in 15 (8.5%), and combined f-QRS/ERP in 4 patients (2.3%). After a mean follow-up of 95.2±51.9 months, spontaneous sustained ventricular arrhythmias were documented in 8 patients (16.7%). No significant difference was found in the rate of appropriate shocks between patients presenting with f-QRS or ERP and those without abnormalities. Patients with both f-QRS and ERP had a significantly higher rate of appropriate shocks (HR: 4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-19.7; P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS Fragmented QRS and ERP are common ECG findings in high-risk BrS patients, occurring in up to 27% of cases. When combined, f-QRS and ERP confer a higher risk of appropriate ICD interventions during a very long-term follow-up. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2109-2116).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Cardiocentro Ticino
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:23 September 2016
Deposited On:08 Dec 2016 08:54
Last Modified:18 Dec 2016 06:11
Publisher:The Japanese Circulation Society
ISSN:1346-9843
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0370
PubMed ID:27558008

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