Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cleavage structures and dimensions of ideology in english politics: Evidence from voting advice application data


Wheatley, Jonathan (2016). Cleavage structures and dimensions of ideology in english politics: Evidence from voting advice application data. Policy & Internet, 8(4):457-477.

Abstract

The Left–Right dimension is the most common way of conceptualizing ideological difference. It is based on the traditional cleavage in society between capital and labor. But in an ever more globalized world, are the concepts of Left and Right as relevant today as they were half a century ago? Following Kriesi et al. (2006) this article argues that the cleavage that exists in many European societies between “winners” and “losers” of globalization has engendered a new ideological dimension that pits “cosmopolitans” against “communitarians” and that draws on cultural issues relating to identity, rather than economic issues. This argument is tested by identifying latent dimensions from opinion data generated by two Voting Advice Applications deployed in England in 2014 and 2015 and by mapping the positions of party supporters with respect to these dimensions. It is found that in England the political space is defined by two main ideological dimensions: an economic Left–Right dimension and a cultural communitarian–cosmopolitan dimension. Finally, supporters of the newly formed United Kingdom Independence Party are found to be located near the communitarian pole of the cultural dimension.

Abstract

The Left–Right dimension is the most common way of conceptualizing ideological difference. It is based on the traditional cleavage in society between capital and labor. But in an ever more globalized world, are the concepts of Left and Right as relevant today as they were half a century ago? Following Kriesi et al. (2006) this article argues that the cleavage that exists in many European societies between “winners” and “losers” of globalization has engendered a new ideological dimension that pits “cosmopolitans” against “communitarians” and that draws on cultural issues relating to identity, rather than economic issues. This argument is tested by identifying latent dimensions from opinion data generated by two Voting Advice Applications deployed in England in 2014 and 2015 and by mapping the positions of party supporters with respect to these dimensions. It is found that in England the political space is defined by two main ideological dimensions: an economic Left–Right dimension and a cultural communitarian–cosmopolitan dimension. Finally, supporters of the newly formed United Kingdom Independence Party are found to be located near the communitarian pole of the cultural dimension.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 16 Dec 2016
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:02 Faculty of Law > Centre for Democracy Studies Aarau (C2D)
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
Uncontrolled Keywords:cleavages; ideological dimensions; political parties; voting advice applications; VAA; mokken scale analysis
Language:English
Date:29 August 2016
Deposited On:16 Dec 2016 10:19
Last Modified:16 Dec 2016 10:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1944-2866
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/poi3.129
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:default_scope:ebi01_prod010359436 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Repository staff only until 29 August 2018
Size: 878kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2018-08-29

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations