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Patients’ early post-operative experiences with lung transplantation: a longitudinal qualitative study


Seiler, Annina; Klaghofer, Richard; Drabe, Natalie; Martin-Soelch, Chantal; Hinderling-Baertschi, Vera; Goetzmann, Lutz; Boehler, Annette; Buechi, Stefan; Jenewein, Josef (2016). Patients’ early post-operative experiences with lung transplantation: a longitudinal qualitative study. The Patient, 9(6):547-557.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lung transplantation is a complex medical treatment, and for patients with end-stage lung diseases it is often the last therapeutic option available for survival. However, lung transplantation poses not only a physical but also a psychological challenge for patients. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of patients' individual concerns related to their lung transplantation within the first 6 months post-transplant. METHODS: Forty lung transplant patients were interviewed at three different measurement timepoints post-transplant (T1: 2 weeks; T2: 3 months; and T3: 6 months) using semi-structured interviews to address their thoughts, feelings, and attitudes with respect to the transplantation process, their new lungs, and their medication. Interviews were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: "Physical complaints", "fear of organ rejection", "side effects of medication", and "restrictions in everyday life" were the most frequently named concerns within the first 6 months post-transplant. Most themes remained unchanged over time, whereas mentions of restrictions in everyday life increased significantly over the three assessments. CONCLUSIONS: Although the majority of the patients experienced considerable improvements in physical health after transplantation, they simultaneously reported that they were suffering from physical complaints, fear of organ rejection and infections, medication adverse effects, and restrictions in everyday life. For patients, lung transplantation therefore often means replacing one disease with another. Healthcare providers are challenged to support patients in dealing with this unresolvable dilemma.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lung transplantation is a complex medical treatment, and for patients with end-stage lung diseases it is often the last therapeutic option available for survival. However, lung transplantation poses not only a physical but also a psychological challenge for patients. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of patients' individual concerns related to their lung transplantation within the first 6 months post-transplant. METHODS: Forty lung transplant patients were interviewed at three different measurement timepoints post-transplant (T1: 2 weeks; T2: 3 months; and T3: 6 months) using semi-structured interviews to address their thoughts, feelings, and attitudes with respect to the transplantation process, their new lungs, and their medication. Interviews were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: "Physical complaints", "fear of organ rejection", "side effects of medication", and "restrictions in everyday life" were the most frequently named concerns within the first 6 months post-transplant. Most themes remained unchanged over time, whereas mentions of restrictions in everyday life increased significantly over the three assessments. CONCLUSIONS: Although the majority of the patients experienced considerable improvements in physical health after transplantation, they simultaneously reported that they were suffering from physical complaints, fear of organ rejection and infections, medication adverse effects, and restrictions in everyday life. For patients, lung transplantation therefore often means replacing one disease with another. Healthcare providers are challenged to support patients in dealing with this unresolvable dilemma.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:12 Dec 2016 08:25
Last Modified:12 Dec 2016 08:25
Publisher:Adis International Ltd.
ISSN:1178-1653
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s40271-016-0174-z
PubMed ID:27139224

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