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GM-CSF: from growth factor to central mediator of tissue inflammation


Becher, Burkhard; Tugues, Sonia; Greter, Melanie (2016). GM-CSF: from growth factor to central mediator of tissue inflammation. Immunity, 45(5):963-973.

Abstract

The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was initially classified as a hematopoietic growth factor. However, unlike its close relatives macrophage CSF (M-CSF) and granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), the majority of myeloid cells do not require GM-CSF for steady-state myelopoiesis. Instead, in inflammation, GM-CSF serves as a communication conduit between tissue-invading lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Even though lymphocytes are in all likelihood the instigators of chronic inflammatory disease, GM-CSF-activated phagocytes are well equipped to cause tissue damage. The pivotal role of GM-CSF at the T cell:myeloid cell interface might shift our attention toward studying the function of the myeloid compartment in immunopathology. Targeting specifically the crosstalk between T cells and myeloid cells through GM-CSF holds promise for the development of therapeutics to combat chronic tissue inflammation. Here, we will review some of the major discoveries of the recent past, which indicate that GM-CSF is so much more than its name suggests.

Abstract

The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was initially classified as a hematopoietic growth factor. However, unlike its close relatives macrophage CSF (M-CSF) and granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), the majority of myeloid cells do not require GM-CSF for steady-state myelopoiesis. Instead, in inflammation, GM-CSF serves as a communication conduit between tissue-invading lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Even though lymphocytes are in all likelihood the instigators of chronic inflammatory disease, GM-CSF-activated phagocytes are well equipped to cause tissue damage. The pivotal role of GM-CSF at the T cell:myeloid cell interface might shift our attention toward studying the function of the myeloid compartment in immunopathology. Targeting specifically the crosstalk between T cells and myeloid cells through GM-CSF holds promise for the development of therapeutics to combat chronic tissue inflammation. Here, we will review some of the major discoveries of the recent past, which indicate that GM-CSF is so much more than its name suggests.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Translational Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 November 2016
Deposited On:16 Dec 2016 09:48
Last Modified:16 Dec 2016 09:49
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1074-7613
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2016.10.026
PubMed ID:27851925

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