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Lower limb revascularisation preceding surgical wound coverage - an interdisciplinary algorithm for chronic wound closure


Aust, M C; Spies, M; Guggenheim, M; Gohritz, A; Kall, S; Rosenthal, H; Pichlmaier, M; Oehlert, G; Vogt, P M (2008). Lower limb revascularisation preceding surgical wound coverage - an interdisciplinary algorithm for chronic wound closure. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, 61(8):925-933.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic wounds may occur or persist due to arterial insufficiency. Despite the high prevalence of arterial occlusive disease, a search of the literature has yielded a paucity of data on the benefit of interventions to recanalise lower extremity arteries prior to surgical closure of chronic wounds. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation of simple clinical examinations and apparative diagnostics for the detection of arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity in patients with chronic wounds, and to evaluate the benefit of vascular procedures to optimise wound perfusion before surgical closure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During a 6-year period, 150 patients with chronic lower extremity wounds (no healing for more than 30 days) were included into this prospective study. All patients underwent palpation of foot pulses, Doppler sonography and measurement of occlusive pressures. Positive clinical findings were re-evaluated by angiography. All patients with peripheral extremity vessel occlusions underwent vascular interventions (percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting, open thrombectomy or vascular bypass surgery) prior to surgical wound closure. RESULTS: In all 34 patients (21%) with missing foot pulses, suspicious Doppler signals or pathological occlusive pressure measurements, the clinical diagnosis of arterial occlusion was confirmed by angiography. An arterial pathology had previously been diagnosed in merely two of those patients. Nineteen patients underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and 21 stents were implanted; in 10 cases, open thrombectomy or vascular bypasses were performed. In all 34 patients, sufficient peripheral recanalisation and improved wound perfusion were successfully achieved. For definitive wound closure, microsurgical tissue transplantation was performed in 15 patients. Angiography was performed prior to surgery. In 11 patients, regional or local flaps were used. Six patients received split skin grafting only; two wounds healed conservatively following vascular intervention. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was applied in 15 cases. Postoperatively, three cases of impaired wound healing and one infection occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Arterial insufficiency can be diagnosed safely by simple clinical examination. All clinically pathological results were successfully confirmed by angiography, allowing for a targeted peripheral vessel reopening to improve wound perfusion before surgery. This straightforward algorithm helped to improve the success of surgical therapy of chronic lower extremity wounds.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic wounds may occur or persist due to arterial insufficiency. Despite the high prevalence of arterial occlusive disease, a search of the literature has yielded a paucity of data on the benefit of interventions to recanalise lower extremity arteries prior to surgical closure of chronic wounds. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation of simple clinical examinations and apparative diagnostics for the detection of arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity in patients with chronic wounds, and to evaluate the benefit of vascular procedures to optimise wound perfusion before surgical closure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During a 6-year period, 150 patients with chronic lower extremity wounds (no healing for more than 30 days) were included into this prospective study. All patients underwent palpation of foot pulses, Doppler sonography and measurement of occlusive pressures. Positive clinical findings were re-evaluated by angiography. All patients with peripheral extremity vessel occlusions underwent vascular interventions (percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting, open thrombectomy or vascular bypass surgery) prior to surgical wound closure. RESULTS: In all 34 patients (21%) with missing foot pulses, suspicious Doppler signals or pathological occlusive pressure measurements, the clinical diagnosis of arterial occlusion was confirmed by angiography. An arterial pathology had previously been diagnosed in merely two of those patients. Nineteen patients underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and 21 stents were implanted; in 10 cases, open thrombectomy or vascular bypasses were performed. In all 34 patients, sufficient peripheral recanalisation and improved wound perfusion were successfully achieved. For definitive wound closure, microsurgical tissue transplantation was performed in 15 patients. Angiography was performed prior to surgery. In 11 patients, regional or local flaps were used. Six patients received split skin grafting only; two wounds healed conservatively following vascular intervention. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was applied in 15 cases. Postoperatively, three cases of impaired wound healing and one infection occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Arterial insufficiency can be diagnosed safely by simple clinical examination. All clinically pathological results were successfully confirmed by angiography, allowing for a targeted peripheral vessel reopening to improve wound perfusion before surgery. This straightforward algorithm helped to improve the success of surgical therapy of chronic lower extremity wounds.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2 April 2008
Deposited On:13 Feb 2009 09:42
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 17:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1748-6815
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2007.09.060
PubMed ID:18407817

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