Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Auswilderung von Wildfeliden : Gefahr der Freisetzung von Virusinfektionen


Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Fehr, D; Leutenegger, C; Hartmann, M; Ossent, Pete; Grob, M; Elgizoli, M; Weilenmann, P (1996). Auswilderung von Wildfeliden : Gefahr der Freisetzung von Virusinfektionen. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 138(12):579-585.

Abstract

There are several felidae amongst the numerous endangered species. Means of aiding survival are the reintroduction to the wild of animals bred under the auspices of man and their relocation from densely populated to thinly populated areas. It is unlikely that the dangers of such reintroduction or relocation projects have been examined sufficiently in respect to the risks of virus infections confronting individuals kept in zoos or similar situations. This report presents three examples to illustrate that accidental virus infections may be expected to occur when relocating and reintroducing wild cats. The first example is the reintroduction of captive snow leopards. Zoo bred snow leopards may be infected with FIV, a virus infection that is highly unlikely to occur in the original himalayan highlands of Tibet and China. A second example is of several cases of FIP that occurred in European wild cats bred in groups in captivity. The third example mentioned is the relocation of lions from East Africa where all the commonly known feline viruses are wide-spread to the Etosha National Park. In the latter, virus infections such as FIV, FCV and FPV do not occur. The indiscriminate relocation and reintroduction of the wild cats mentioned here harbours a potential of undesirable consequences.

Abstract

There are several felidae amongst the numerous endangered species. Means of aiding survival are the reintroduction to the wild of animals bred under the auspices of man and their relocation from densely populated to thinly populated areas. It is unlikely that the dangers of such reintroduction or relocation projects have been examined sufficiently in respect to the risks of virus infections confronting individuals kept in zoos or similar situations. This report presents three examples to illustrate that accidental virus infections may be expected to occur when relocating and reintroducing wild cats. The first example is the reintroduction of captive snow leopards. Zoo bred snow leopards may be infected with FIV, a virus infection that is highly unlikely to occur in the original himalayan highlands of Tibet and China. A second example is of several cases of FIP that occurred in European wild cats bred in groups in captivity. The third example mentioned is the relocation of lions from East Africa where all the commonly known feline viruses are wide-spread to the Etosha National Park. In the latter, virus infections such as FIV, FCV and FPV do not occur. The indiscriminate relocation and reintroduction of the wild cats mentioned here harbours a potential of undesirable consequences.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 28 Dec 2016
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Other titles:Liberation into the wild of wild felines: danger of the release of virus infections
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:felids - liberation - FIV - FIP - viral infections
Language:German
Date:1996
Deposited On:28 Dec 2016 10:49
Last Modified:28 Dec 2016 10:49
Publisher:Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte
ISSN:0036-7281
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://doi.org/10.5169/seals-593165 (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:9045289

Download

Content: Published Version
Language: German
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 8MB