Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection leads to increased incidence of feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL)


Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Berger, Marianne; Sigrist, Brigitte; Schawalder, Peter; Lutz, Hans (1998). Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection leads to increased incidence of feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL). Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, 65(2-4):299-308.

Abstract

Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL), previously known as 'neck lesions,' are commonly known in domestic, but also in non-domestic cats. They are characterized by odontoclastic resorptive processes, which take place at the dental root and at the periodontium. Chronic inflammation of gingiva and periodontium is believed to be an important etiological factor in the development of FORL. In this context, various feline viruses have been discussed to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The aim of this project was to determine in a blinded study the incidence of FORL in 10 cats which were infected for several years with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), but were otherwise free of feline viral infections (feline leukemia virus, feline calicivirus, feline herpesvirus, feline parvovirus, feline coronavirus, feline syncytium-forming virus). Nine age-matched controls were kept under identical conditions, but free of FIV. Subgingival resorptive lesions were found in six of 10 FIV-positive cats, but in three of nine controls only. FIV-positive cats had significantly more often gingivae with an increased tendency for bleeding upon probing than FIV-negative cats (p=0.0055), and they had slightly more often hyperplastic gingivae (p=0.0867). In conclusion, signs characteristic of FORL such as subgingival lesions, granulomatous or hyperplastic gingivae with a tendency for bleeding, were found significantly more often in FIV-positive cats than in the controls (p=0.0198). Therefore, it was concluded that FIV infection is an important factor for the occurrence of FORL, possibly through immune suppression or changes of the (sub)gingival micro-environment. However, non-infected control cats also showed some evidence of FORL in the absence of all tested viral infections. Therefore, factors other than viral infections must also play a role in the development of FORL in cats.

Abstract

Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL), previously known as 'neck lesions,' are commonly known in domestic, but also in non-domestic cats. They are characterized by odontoclastic resorptive processes, which take place at the dental root and at the periodontium. Chronic inflammation of gingiva and periodontium is believed to be an important etiological factor in the development of FORL. In this context, various feline viruses have been discussed to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The aim of this project was to determine in a blinded study the incidence of FORL in 10 cats which were infected for several years with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), but were otherwise free of feline viral infections (feline leukemia virus, feline calicivirus, feline herpesvirus, feline parvovirus, feline coronavirus, feline syncytium-forming virus). Nine age-matched controls were kept under identical conditions, but free of FIV. Subgingival resorptive lesions were found in six of 10 FIV-positive cats, but in three of nine controls only. FIV-positive cats had significantly more often gingivae with an increased tendency for bleeding upon probing than FIV-negative cats (p=0.0055), and they had slightly more often hyperplastic gingivae (p=0.0867). In conclusion, signs characteristic of FORL such as subgingival lesions, granulomatous or hyperplastic gingivae with a tendency for bleeding, were found significantly more often in FIV-positive cats than in the controls (p=0.0198). Therefore, it was concluded that FIV infection is an important factor for the occurrence of FORL, possibly through immune suppression or changes of the (sub)gingival micro-environment. However, non-infected control cats also showed some evidence of FORL in the absence of all tested viral infections. Therefore, factors other than viral infections must also play a role in the development of FORL in cats.

Statistics

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 28 Dec 2016
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cats; Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL); Feline viruses; Neck lesions
Language:English
Date:23 October 1998
Deposited On:28 Dec 2016 11:14
Last Modified:01 Jan 2017 06:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-2427
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0165-2427(98)00163-9
PubMed ID:9839881

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 87kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations