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How much liver needs to be transected in ALPPS? A translational study investigating the concept of less invasiveness


Linecker, Michael; Kambakamba, Patryk; Reiner, Cäcilia S; Linh Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan; Stavrou, Gregor A; Jenner, Robert M; Oldhafer, Karl J; Björnsson, Bergthor; Schlegel, Andrea; Györi, Georg; Schneider, Marcel André; Lesurtel, Mickael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Petrowsky, Henrik (2017). How much liver needs to be transected in ALPPS? A translational study investigating the concept of less invasiveness. Surgery, 161(2):453-464.

Abstract

BACKGROUND ALPPS induces rapid liver hypertrophy after stage-1 operation, enabling safe, extended resections (stage-2) after a short period. Recent studies have suggested that partial transection at stage-1 might be associated with a better safety profile. The aim of this study was to assess the amount of liver parenchyma that needs to be divided to achieve sufficient liver hypertrophy in ALPPS. METHODS In a bi-institutional, prospective cohort study, nonfibrotic patients who underwent ALPPS with complete (n = 22) or partial (n = 23) transection for colorectal liver metastases were analyzed and compared with an external ALPPS cohort (n = 23). A radiologic tool was developed to quantify the amount of parenchymal transection. Liver hypertrophy and clinical outcome were compared between both techniques. The relationship of partial transection and hypertrophy was investigated further in an experimental murine model of partial ALPPS. RESULT The median amount of parenchymal transection in partial ALPPS was 61% (range, 34-86%). The radiologic method correlated poorly with the intraoperative surgeon's estimation (rS = 0.258). Liver hypertrophy was equivalent for the partial ALPPS, ALPPS, and external ALPPS cohort (64% vs 60% vs. 64%). Experimental data demonstrated that partial transection of at least 50% induced comparable hypertrophy (137% vs 156%) and hepatocyte proliferation compared to complete transection. CONCLUSION The study provides clinical and experimental evidence that partial liver partition of at least 50% seems to be equally effective in triggering volume hypertrophy as observed with complete transection and can be re recommended as less invasive alternative to ALPPS.

Abstract

BACKGROUND ALPPS induces rapid liver hypertrophy after stage-1 operation, enabling safe, extended resections (stage-2) after a short period. Recent studies have suggested that partial transection at stage-1 might be associated with a better safety profile. The aim of this study was to assess the amount of liver parenchyma that needs to be divided to achieve sufficient liver hypertrophy in ALPPS. METHODS In a bi-institutional, prospective cohort study, nonfibrotic patients who underwent ALPPS with complete (n = 22) or partial (n = 23) transection for colorectal liver metastases were analyzed and compared with an external ALPPS cohort (n = 23). A radiologic tool was developed to quantify the amount of parenchymal transection. Liver hypertrophy and clinical outcome were compared between both techniques. The relationship of partial transection and hypertrophy was investigated further in an experimental murine model of partial ALPPS. RESULT The median amount of parenchymal transection in partial ALPPS was 61% (range, 34-86%). The radiologic method correlated poorly with the intraoperative surgeon's estimation (rS = 0.258). Liver hypertrophy was equivalent for the partial ALPPS, ALPPS, and external ALPPS cohort (64% vs 60% vs. 64%). Experimental data demonstrated that partial transection of at least 50% induced comparable hypertrophy (137% vs 156%) and hepatocyte proliferation compared to complete transection. CONCLUSION The study provides clinical and experimental evidence that partial liver partition of at least 50% seems to be equally effective in triggering volume hypertrophy as observed with complete transection and can be re recommended as less invasive alternative to ALPPS.

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8 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:29 Dec 2016 09:34
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 21:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0039-6060
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2016.08.004
PubMed ID:27814957

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