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Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of renal proximal tubular Na/phosphate cotransport


Murer, H; Lötscher, M; Kaissling, B; Biber, J (1996). Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of renal proximal tubular Na/phosphate cotransport. Kidney & Blood Pressure Research, 19(3-4):151-154.

Abstract

Renal proximal tubular Na/phosphate cotransport is the key target in the control of renal phosphate handling. Using molecular tools for the type II Na/phosphate cotransporter, it could be documented that altered brush border membrane phosphate transport reflects a state of altered brush border expression of the specific transporter molecule. This alteration is either the consequence of specific membrane insertion/retrieval processes and/or reflects states of altered synthesisdegradation of the transporter.

Abstract

Renal proximal tubular Na/phosphate cotransport is the key target in the control of renal phosphate handling. Using molecular tools for the type II Na/phosphate cotransporter, it could be documented that altered brush border membrane phosphate transport reflects a state of altered brush border expression of the specific transporter molecule. This alteration is either the consequence of specific membrane insertion/retrieval processes and/or reflects states of altered synthesisdegradation of the transporter.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Brush border membrane, Proximal tubule, Phosphate reabsorption, Parathyroid hormone, Low-phosphate diet, X-linked hypophosphatemia
Language:English
Date:1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:22
Last Modified:29 Aug 2017 15:16
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1420-4096
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000174063
PubMed ID:8887250

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