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Distribution of virulence factors in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from the environment, livestock, food and humans


Müller, Andrea; Stephan, Roger; Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena (2016). Distribution of virulence factors in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from the environment, livestock, food and humans. Science of the Total Environment, 541:667-672.

Abstract

In this study, extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from the following sources were characterized with regard to the occurrence and distribution of uropathogenic and enteric pathogenic virulence factors: surface waters (rivers and lakes, n=60), the intestines of freshwater fish (n=33), fresh vegetables (n=26), retail poultry meat (n=13) and the fecal samples of livestock (n=28), healthy humans (n=34) and primary care patients (n=13). Among the 207 isolates, 82% tested positive by PCR for one or more of the virulence factors (VF) that predict uropathogenicity, TraT, fyuA, chuA, PAI, yfcv or vat. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) were detected in each of the analyzed sources. Regarding virulence factors for intestinal pathogenic E. coli, these were found more rarely and predominantly associated with the aquatic environment, with aagR (EAEC) found in isolates from surface waters and STp (porcine heat stable enterotoxin) and LT (heat-labile enterotoxin) associated with isolates from fish. Aggregate VF scores (the number of unique virulence factors detected for each isolate) were lowest among isolates belonging to phylogenetic group B1 and highest among group B2. Clustering of the isolates by phylogenetic group, multilocus sequence type (MLST) and ESBL-types revealed clonal overlaps of A:ST10(CTX-M-1) and D:ST350(CTX-M-1) between the sources of livestock, poultry meat and healthy humans, suggesting livestock, in particular poultry, represents a potential reservoir for these particular UPEC clones. The clones A:ST10(CTX-M-55) and B2:ST131(CTX-M-27), harboring uropathogenic virulence factors were significantly associated with fresh vegetables and with fish, respectively. Further clonal complexes with source overlaps included D:ST38(CTX-M-14), D:ST69(CTX-M-15), D:ST405(CTX-M-15) and D:ST648(CTX-M-15), which were found in surface water and healthy humans. Identifying potential reservoirs of UPEC in the environment, animals, food and humans is important in order to assess routes of transmission and risk factors for acquiring UPEC

Abstract

In this study, extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from the following sources were characterized with regard to the occurrence and distribution of uropathogenic and enteric pathogenic virulence factors: surface waters (rivers and lakes, n=60), the intestines of freshwater fish (n=33), fresh vegetables (n=26), retail poultry meat (n=13) and the fecal samples of livestock (n=28), healthy humans (n=34) and primary care patients (n=13). Among the 207 isolates, 82% tested positive by PCR for one or more of the virulence factors (VF) that predict uropathogenicity, TraT, fyuA, chuA, PAI, yfcv or vat. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) were detected in each of the analyzed sources. Regarding virulence factors for intestinal pathogenic E. coli, these were found more rarely and predominantly associated with the aquatic environment, with aagR (EAEC) found in isolates from surface waters and STp (porcine heat stable enterotoxin) and LT (heat-labile enterotoxin) associated with isolates from fish. Aggregate VF scores (the number of unique virulence factors detected for each isolate) were lowest among isolates belonging to phylogenetic group B1 and highest among group B2. Clustering of the isolates by phylogenetic group, multilocus sequence type (MLST) and ESBL-types revealed clonal overlaps of A:ST10(CTX-M-1) and D:ST350(CTX-M-1) between the sources of livestock, poultry meat and healthy humans, suggesting livestock, in particular poultry, represents a potential reservoir for these particular UPEC clones. The clones A:ST10(CTX-M-55) and B2:ST131(CTX-M-27), harboring uropathogenic virulence factors were significantly associated with fresh vegetables and with fish, respectively. Further clonal complexes with source overlaps included D:ST38(CTX-M-14), D:ST69(CTX-M-15), D:ST405(CTX-M-15) and D:ST648(CTX-M-15), which were found in surface water and healthy humans. Identifying potential reservoirs of UPEC in the environment, animals, food and humans is important in order to assess routes of transmission and risk factors for acquiring UPEC

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:CTX-M; Clones; Enterobacteriaceae; Environmental sources; Uropathogenicity
Language:English
Date:15 January 2016
Deposited On:23 Jan 2017 13:01
Last Modified:24 Jan 2017 04:23
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0048-9697
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.09.135
PubMed ID:26437344

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Language: English
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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

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