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Unravelling 5-oxoprolinuria (pyroglutamic aciduria) due to bi-allelic OPLAH mutations: 20 new mutations in 14 families


Abstract

Primary 5-oxoprolinuria (pyroglutamic aciduria) is caused by a genetic defect in the γ-glutamyl cycle, affecting either glutathione synthetase or 5-oxoprolinase. While several dozens of patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency have been reported, with hemolytic anemia representing the clinical key feature, 5-oxoprolinase deficiency due to OPLAH mutations is less frequent and so far has not attracted much attention. This has prompted us to investigate the clinical phenotype as well as the underlying genotype in patients from 14 families of various ethnic backgrounds who underwent diagnostic mutation analysis following the detection of 5-oxoprolinuria. In all patients with 5-oxoprolinuria studied, bi-allelic mutations in OPLAH were indicated. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for 5-oxoprolinase deficiency is further supported by the identification of a single mutation in all 9/14 parent sample sets investigated (except for the father of one patient whose result suggests homozygosity), and the absence of 5-oxoprolinuria in all tested heterozygotes. It is remarkable, that all 20 mutations identified were novel and private to the respective families. Clinical features were highly variable and in several sib pairs, did not segregate with 5-oxoprolinuria. Although a pathogenic role of 5-oxoprolinase deficiency remains possible, this is not supported by our findings. Additional patient ascertainment and long-term follow-up is needed to establish the benign nature of this inborn error of metabolism. It is important that all symptomatic patients with persistently elevated levels of 5-oxoproline and no obvious explanation are investigated for the genetic etiology.

Abstract

Primary 5-oxoprolinuria (pyroglutamic aciduria) is caused by a genetic defect in the γ-glutamyl cycle, affecting either glutathione synthetase or 5-oxoprolinase. While several dozens of patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency have been reported, with hemolytic anemia representing the clinical key feature, 5-oxoprolinase deficiency due to OPLAH mutations is less frequent and so far has not attracted much attention. This has prompted us to investigate the clinical phenotype as well as the underlying genotype in patients from 14 families of various ethnic backgrounds who underwent diagnostic mutation analysis following the detection of 5-oxoprolinuria. In all patients with 5-oxoprolinuria studied, bi-allelic mutations in OPLAH were indicated. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for 5-oxoprolinase deficiency is further supported by the identification of a single mutation in all 9/14 parent sample sets investigated (except for the father of one patient whose result suggests homozygosity), and the absence of 5-oxoprolinuria in all tested heterozygotes. It is remarkable, that all 20 mutations identified were novel and private to the respective families. Clinical features were highly variable and in several sib pairs, did not segregate with 5-oxoprolinuria. Although a pathogenic role of 5-oxoprolinase deficiency remains possible, this is not supported by our findings. Additional patient ascertainment and long-term follow-up is needed to establish the benign nature of this inborn error of metabolism. It is important that all symptomatic patients with persistently elevated levels of 5-oxoproline and no obvious explanation are investigated for the genetic etiology.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2016
Deposited On:12 Jan 2017 08:44
Last Modified:12 Jan 2017 08:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1096-7192
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymgme.2016.07.008
PubMed ID:27477828

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