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TRPV4 is associated with central rather than nephrogenic osmoregulation


Janas, Sylvie; Seghers, François; Schakman, Olivier; Alsady, Mohammad; Deen, Peter; Vriens, Joris; Tissir, Fadel; Nilius, Bernd; Loffing, Johannes; Gailly, Philippe; Devuyst, Olivier (2016). TRPV4 is associated with central rather than nephrogenic osmoregulation. Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology, 468(9):1595-1607.

Abstract

TRPV4 is a polymodal cation channel expressed in osmosensitive neurons of the hypothalamus and in the mammalian nephron. The segmental distribution and role(s) of TRPV4 in osmoregulation remain debated. We investigated the renal distribution pattern of TRPV4 and the functional consequences of its disruption in mouse models. Using qPCR on microdissected segments, immunohistochemistry, and a LacZ reporter mouse, we found that TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in the proximal tubule, the late distal convoluted tubule, and throughout the connecting tubule and collecting duct, including principal and intercalated cells. TRPV4 was undetectable in the glomeruli and thick ascending limb and weakly abundant in the early distal convoluted tubule. Metabolic studies in Trpv4$^{+/+}$ and Trpv4$^{-/-}$ littermates revealed that the lack of TRPV4 did not influence activity, food and water intake, renal function, and urinary concentration at baseline. The mice showed a similar response to furosemide, water loading and deprivation, acid loading, and dietary NaCl restriction. However, Trpv4$^{-/-}$ mice showed a significantly lower vasopressin synthesis and release after water deprivation, with a loss of the positive correlation between plasma osmolality and plasma vasopressin levels, and a delayed water intake upon acute administration of hypertonic saline. Specific activation of TRPV4 in primary cultures of proximal tubule cells increased albumin uptake, whereas no effect of TRPV4 deletion could be observed at baseline. These data reveal that, despite its abundant expression in tubular segments, TRPV4 does not play a major role in the kidney or is efficiently compensated when deleted. Instead, TRPV4 is critical for the release of vasopressin, the sensation of thirst, and the central osmoregulation.

Abstract

TRPV4 is a polymodal cation channel expressed in osmosensitive neurons of the hypothalamus and in the mammalian nephron. The segmental distribution and role(s) of TRPV4 in osmoregulation remain debated. We investigated the renal distribution pattern of TRPV4 and the functional consequences of its disruption in mouse models. Using qPCR on microdissected segments, immunohistochemistry, and a LacZ reporter mouse, we found that TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in the proximal tubule, the late distal convoluted tubule, and throughout the connecting tubule and collecting duct, including principal and intercalated cells. TRPV4 was undetectable in the glomeruli and thick ascending limb and weakly abundant in the early distal convoluted tubule. Metabolic studies in Trpv4$^{+/+}$ and Trpv4$^{-/-}$ littermates revealed that the lack of TRPV4 did not influence activity, food and water intake, renal function, and urinary concentration at baseline. The mice showed a similar response to furosemide, water loading and deprivation, acid loading, and dietary NaCl restriction. However, Trpv4$^{-/-}$ mice showed a significantly lower vasopressin synthesis and release after water deprivation, with a loss of the positive correlation between plasma osmolality and plasma vasopressin levels, and a delayed water intake upon acute administration of hypertonic saline. Specific activation of TRPV4 in primary cultures of proximal tubule cells increased albumin uptake, whereas no effect of TRPV4 deletion could be observed at baseline. These data reveal that, despite its abundant expression in tubular segments, TRPV4 does not play a major role in the kidney or is efficiently compensated when deleted. Instead, TRPV4 is critical for the release of vasopressin, the sensation of thirst, and the central osmoregulation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:30 June 2016
Deposited On:13 Feb 2017 09:55
Last Modified:14 Feb 2017 08:49
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0031-6768
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00424-016-1850-5
PubMed ID:27364478

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